1

Bartleby Scrivener Poetry Group Thursday October 1 at Gallery X

Patricia  Gomes

Thursday, October 1, 2015 BARTLEBY SCRIVENER POETRY GROUP & GNB WRITER’S BLOCK will host a special Poetry Workshop from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. at Gallery X, 169 William Street, New Bedford MA.

The Poetry Writing Workshop will be led by Poet Laureate of New Bedford  and GNB Writer’s Block co-founder, Patricia  Gomes. Prompt for poems written during the workshop is “family.” A $3 donation is requested although not required.  The first hour, 6:00 to 7:00 PM will be devoted to silent writing, followed by a shared reading of poems created on the spot.

“I’ve wanted to collaborate with Patricia Gomes and GNB Writer’s Block for awhile and presenting this writing mini-marathon seemed like the perfect match,” said Bartleby Scrivener Poetry Group founder, Susan Grace. “Pat is also a member of Bartleby and having this workshop at Gallery X will offer something a little different from our usual Bartleby poetry discussion format. We will return to our regular meetings in November.”

BARTLEBY SCRIVENER POETRY GROUP is an informal discussion group. The purpose of the group is to invite conversation about poetry and offer encouragement and feed-back to poets in a supportive, creative setting. The format is not a critique workshop. Its focus is to provide a comfortable place where poets and lovers of poetry can talk about poetry and share their work and insights. Bartleby meets the first Thursday of each month at The Wamsutta Club, 427 County Street, New Bedford MA from 6:15-8:30pm.

GNB WRITER’S BLOCK co-founded by Patricia  Gomes and Dawn Lopes promotes poetry, gives and hosts readings and workshops (adult and students), contests, and encourages spreading the poetic word.

For more information about BARTLEBY SCRIVENER POETRY GROUP contact: Susan Grace at (508)993-1999 or email sgrace@encorent.com  

For more information about GNB WRITER’S BLOCK contact: Patricia Gomes patg73@hotmail.com or visit their website at http://www.gnbwritersblock.org/





New Bedford High School opens new pool facility

new-bedford-high-school-new-swimming-pool2

New Bedford High School’s updated new pool facility was opened Thursday morning at the high school by Mayor Jon Mitchell and school officials.

The upgrades have made the new pool a state-of-the-art system with automated treatment mechanisms for its water as well as new cosmetic features including tiling.

“We are making investments in every aspect of New Bedford High School from academics to technology to plant equipment. Upgrades and repairs to this pool facility were long overdue and this project exemplifies our commitment to our students and to getting things done,” said Mayor Mitchell.

new-bedford-high-school-new-swimming-pool

“New Bedford High School continues to aim for excellence in every area,” said Superintendent Pia Durkin. “This investment adds a state-of-the-art swimming pool that’s now available to our student athletes at the high school, which has the widest array of athletics, academics, extracurricular activities and visual and performing arts in the region.”

Headmaster Bernadette Coelho said, “We are dedicated to a tradition of excellence, and that is evidenced by the largest selection of academics focused on college and career readiness, our award-winning visual and performing arts, and our standout athletic teams.”

The upgraded pool facility represents continued investment at New Bedford High School, along with programs such as a new dual enrollment program for Grade 8 students from across the city who now take Grade 9 math and English classes.

The Mobile Technology Learning Center of the University of San Diego has also begun to pilot a one-to-one technology initiative with tablets for NBHS freshmen, funded by alumnus and Qualcomm founder Dr. Irwin Jacobs.




N.B. Public Schools make steady progress on MCAS; continues to narrow proficiency gap

With state data released for 2015, New Bedford Public Schools’ Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) scores for Spring 2015, in the two Level 4 schools that remained with MCAS as part of their turnaround plans, continued to see steady progress, narrowing the proficiency gap with other Commissioner’s Districts and significant gains in many areas.

The scores at the Hayden-McFadden School, the district’s Level 4 elementary school, and New Bedford High School, the district’s Level 4 high school, in many cases outpaced and in others remained on track with growth from the nine other Commissioner’s Districts in Massachusetts. In New Bedford, only Hayden-McFadden and NBHS continued MCAS in 2015, while other schools began the Partnership for Assessing Readiness for College and Career (PARCC).

New Bedford High School’s Grade 10 English Language Arts (ELA) MCAS scores showed meaningful change in increasing the number of students scoring Advanced or Proficient; that rate rose from 66% in 2014 to 69% in 2015. In addition, the school decreased the number of students scoring Needs Improvement and Warning/Failure from 33% in 2014 to 31% in 2015, demonstrating continued progress. (Commissioner’s Districts’ growth for Advanced or Proficient was 4 percentage points; Urban districts’ growth was 4 percentage points; the state average was 1 percentage point. New Bedford remained on track with growth of 3 percentage points.)

The scores at the Hayden-McFadden School, the district’s Level 4 elementary school, and New Bedford High School, the district’s Level 4 high school, in many cases outpaced and in others remained on track with growth from the nine other Commissioner’s Districts in Massachusetts.

NBHS Grade 10 Math MCAS scores showed that Advanced or Proficient scores rose from 41% of students in 2014 to 43% of students in 2015, while the number of students scoring Needs Improvement and Warning/Failure dropped meaningfully, from 59% in 2014 to 54% in 2015. (Commissioner’s Districts’ growth for Advanced or Proficient was 1 percentage point; Urban districts’ growth was 2 percentage points; the state average was 0 percentage point growth. New Bedford remained on track with 2 percentage points of growth).

NBHS Grade 10 Science MCAS scores indicated a significant drop in the number of students scoring Warning/Failure, from 21% in 2014 to 16% in 2015. (Commissioners’ Districts’ average growth for Advanced or Proficient was 1 percentage points; Urban districts’ average growth was 2 percentage points; New Bedford outpaced both with growth of 4 percentage points.)

At Hayden-McFadden, schoolwide and grade-level results showed improvement for the students. Across the school in the ELA MCAS, students scoring Advanced or Proficient rose from 20% in 2014 to 24% in 2015, showing significant progress. Students scoring Needs Improvement and Warning/Failure sank from 80% in 2014 to 77% in 2015.

Grade level results for Hayden-McFadden also remained similar to the Commissioner’s Districts and in several instances exceeded the growth that other Commissioner’s Districts saw.

Hayden-McFadden Grade 3 Math MCAS scores increased significantly. In 2014, 50% of students scored Advanced or Proficient and 50% scored Needs Improvement or Warning/Failure. In 2015, 65% of students scored Advanced or Proficient and 35% scored Needs Improvement or Warning Failure. (Commissioner’s Districts’ average growth for Advanced or Proficient was 3 percentage points; Urban districts’ average growth was 3 percentage points; the state average was 2 percentage points. New Bedford far outpaced this growth and grew by 15 percentage points, five times the urban districts’ average.)

“It is encouraging that our scores have in many cases outpaced the average of districts similar to New Bedford, or have stayed on track,” said Superintendent Pia Durkin.

Hayden-McFadden Grade 4 ELA MCAS scores increased dramatically. In 2014, just 8% of students scored Advanced or Proficient; in 2015, that more than tripled, with 28% of students scoring Advanced or Proficient. (Commissioner’s Districts’ average growth for Advanced or Proficient was 5 percentage points; Urban districts average growth was 4 percentage points; the state average dropped by one percentage point. New Bedford grew by 20 percentage points, five times the urban districts’ average.)

Hayden-McFadden Grade 4 Math MCAS scores increased significantly. In 2014, 14% of students scored Advanced or Proficient; in 2015, that rose to 23% of students who scored Advanced or Proficient. (Commissioner’s Districts’ average growth for Advanced or Proficient was 0 percentage points, remaining stagnant; Urban districts average growth was 4 percentage points; the state average dropped by one percentage point. New Bedford grew by 9 percentage points.)

Hayden-McFadden Grade 5 ELA MCAS scores remained on track, with students at Hayden-McFadden rising from 18% scoring Advanced or Proficient in 2014 to 19% in 2015. Hayden-McFadden saw an 8 percentage point reduction in students scoring Warning/Failure, dropping from 48% in 2014 to 40% in 2015. (Commissioner’s Districts’ average reduction for Warning/Failure was stagnant at 0 percentage points; Urban districts’ average reduction was stagnant at 0 percentage points; the state average reduced Warning/Failure by 1 percentage point. New Bedford reduced significantly by 8 percentages points.)

Hayden-McFadden Grade 5 Math MCAS scores showed a vast improvement in moving students out of the Warning/Failure category. In 2014, 58% of students scored in the Warning/Failure category; that dropped by 18 percentage points to 40% in 2015, a dramatic decrease. (Commissioner’s Districts’ average reduction for Warning/Failure was a decrease of 4 percentage points; Urban districts’ average was a decrease of 3 percentage points; the state average decreased by 3 percentage points. New Bedford decreased Warning/Failure scores by 18 percentage points, six times the average of urban districts.)

“It is encouraging that our scores have in many cases outpaced the average of districts similar to New Bedford, or have stayed on track,” said Superintendent Pia Durkin. “More important than the scores are what they reflect: that more children are learning every day in our schools. The results show that we as a district are targeting our efforts effectively to support our teachers and administrators to give all of our children high-quality, high-caliber instruction in every classroom.”





Heroes and Horses to Name Horse after Trooper in Ceremony on Friday, September 25

Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Trooper Vasquez, and the State Police Mounted Unit will be in attendance at the event.

On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 12:30 p.m., at the Chicopee Police Department, Horses and Heroes will introduce a horse that has been named after Trooper John Vasquez. On April 13, 2012, Trooper Vasquez was injured in a shootout with a dangerous suspect in Chicopee.

The horses from this group are named after law enforcement officers involved in a critical incident. These horses are then donated to various police agencies across the country. Trooper Vasquez (the horse) will be donated to the Philadelphia Police Department Mounted Unit.

Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Trooper Vasquez, and the State Police Mounted Unit will be in attendance at the event.

When: Friday, September 25, 2015 at 12:30 p.m.
Location: Chicopee Police Department, 110 Church Street, Chicopee Ma





New Bedford Man Convicted of 2013 Murder of Retired Woman in Fairhaven

Bristol County District Attorney Thomas M. Quinn III announced that Joshua J. Silva, 38, of New Bedford, was convicted early this afternoon of First Degree murder and armed robbery, connected to the October 2013 homicide of 69-year-old Joyce Howland in Fairhaven.

The jury rendered its verdict shortly after noon today in Fall River Superior Court after deliberating for six hours over the course of the past two days. The trial, which lasted about a week, was prosecuted by Assistant District Attorneys Stephen Nadeau and Katie Rayburn.

Silva, who was an employee of Fairhaven Lumber at the time if the homicide, had been part of a two-man work crew insulating the attic in Ms. Howland’s Hamlet Street home in October, 2013. At some point on October 14th of that year, Mr. Silva entered Ms. Howland’s home, stole jewelry and killed Ms. Howland, a retired Fairhaven teacher, by slicing at her throat with a sharp instrument. Ms. Howland’s body was not discovered until the next day when a concerned friend went to her home to check on her well-being.

After today’s verdict was announced, Superior Court Judge Robert T. Kane sentenced Mr. Silva to serve life in prison with no possibility of future parole.

“This was a brutal and chilling murder. The victim was enjoying her years of retirement at home, minding her own business. She did not deserve this fate,” District Attorney Quinn said. “I am gratified that the jury has found the defendant accountable for this vicious crime. I would also like to thank Assistant District Attorneys Stephen Nadeau and Katie Rayburn, along with Fairhaven Police and State Police Detectives assigned to my office, for their tremendous efforts in the investigation and prosecution of this case.”





New Bedford man arrested for possession of drugs after investigation

Miguel A. Ortega

Last night at approximately 6pm members of the Organized Crime Intelligence Bureau assisted by members of the State Police executed a search warrant at a Weld St. apartment.

This was the result of an investigation by Det. Lavar Gilbert of the New Bedford Police Dept. The target of the investigation was taken into custody while driving back to his home.

As a result of the search, 85 grams of cocaine, 40 grams of heroin, and $3,034 in cash was seized. Also found were cut corner bags, packaging materials and digital scales all indicative of drug dealing activity.

85 grams of cocaine, 40 grams of heroin, and $3,034 in cash

Scheduled to be arraigned this morning in New Bedford district court; Miguel A. Ortega.





Homeowner interrupts burglar; 27 year old female arrested

Jessica Silva age 27 of New Bedford.

Yesterday afternoon at approximately 1:00 pm Officer Dan Sweeney was dispatched to the 900 block of Pontiac St. on a break in progress.

The homeowner came home in response to a burglar alarm activation and found the suspect inside. She was in possession of cash and jewelry that she was stealing from the house.

The homeowner kept her at bay until the police arrived.

Scheduled to be arraigned this morning in New Bedford district court on Breaking and Entering charges;
Jessica Silva age 27 of New Bedford.





Fairhaven’s Annual Harvest Fun Day will be Saturday, October 10

Fun for the whole family!

Bring the family to celebrate autumn at Fairhaven’s annual Harvest Fun Day, to be held on Saturday, October 10, 2015, on the lawn of Fairhaven High School at the Visitors Center, 141 Main Street. It will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Harvest Fun Day features a varied group of 37 booths by local organizations and businesses with children’s activities and games, arts and crafts, Fairhaven items, food and sweet treats.

Children’s activities include a bounce house, face painting and henna designs by Heart Henna, pumpkin decorating with the Rotary Club of Fairhaven, craft making with Dream Land Arts and Crafts, a fall-themed photo booth, and other games and activities. You can meet fun-loving pirates from Characters of Fairhaven and princesses from Princesses of New Bedford.

Items for sale include woven elastic bracelets, doll bedding and accessories, homemade soaps and balm, photographs by James Mahaney and Jack Iddon, sea glass jewelry, locally written books, decorative wreaths, hand dyed silk scarves, decorations made from seashells, wooden decorations and furnishings, Christmas ornaments, pet treats, and more.

When hunger sets in, food choices include caçoila sandwiches from the North Fairhaven Improvement Association booth. The Seaport Inn will be serving food as well. To satisfy your sweet tooth, Emma Jean’s will be selling apple cider donuts, fruit pies, whoopie pies, and other treats The Lions Club is offering apple crisp with ice cream. There will also be fudge from Dorothy Cox’s, Del’s Frozen Lemonade, bottled water and soda.

The Fairhaven Business Association will have a booth for antiques appraisals, with a charge of $5 per piece. At the booth of Whaling City Ghosts there will be psychic readings by Susan Swanbeck for $20.

Musical entertainment will be provided by The Showstoppers, under the direction of Kelly Zucco, from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Harvest Fun Day is organized and sponsored by the Fairhaven Office of Tourism. For more information, call 508-979-4085 or email FairhavenTours@aol.com.

BOOTHS for Harvest Fun Day 2015

Friends of Fairhaven COA: Town Hall Christmas ornaments

Heart Henna: face painting, henna, handmade soap, fall candles

Creations by Sara: handmade nautical sea shell frames, ornaments

CIS Designs: sea glass and bead jewelry

A Mermaid’s Treasures: decorations with shells and photos

Tastefully Simple by Pattie P.: food products

Whaling City Ghosts, books, spooky stories, psychic readings by Susan Swanbeck $20

James Mahaney Photography: prints, note cards, specialty items

Four Paws Up Bakery & Boutique: dog treats & accessories

Dream Land Arts & Crafts: craft making for children

Friends of the Millicent Library:

George Thatcher Sr.: wooden lawn decorations

Cathy Carvalho: natural body scrubs, wooden crafts

Erin’s Creations: hair accessories and Fairhaven themed magnets

Princesses of New Bedford: meet & greet princess characters

Carol Burt: wreaths and things

Peggy O’Neil: beads

Jack Iddon: framed and unframed matted photographs, note cards

Characters of Fairhaven: pirate characters and activities

Fairhaven Business Association: antiques appraisals, $5 per piece

Fairhaven Village Militia: Bounce house

Baby Doll Bedding and Boas: Bedding and sleeping bags for American girl dolls

Veronika’s Scarves and Silks: Hand decorated silk scarves

FHS Class of 2016: fall photo op, kids game, felt pennants

George McAndrew: elastic bracelets

The Pallet Barn: upcycled wooden décor

Maria Machado: handmade jewelry, including children’s/Disney

Fairhaven Bikeway Committee: information

Jamberry by Desirae, Jamberry nails

Community Trail Network: information, raffle

Rotary Club of Fairhaven: pumpkin decorating, garland making

FOOD & REFRESHMENT

Emma Jean’s: apple cider donuts, whoopie pies, fruit pies, candy apples, more

North Fairhaven Improvement Association: cacoila sandwiches, soda

FHS Honor Society: bottled water, hot chocolate

Seaport Inn & Marina: food

Fairhaven Lions Club: apple crisp, ice cream

Dorothy Cox’s Candy: fudge, Del’s Frozen Lemonade

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

The Showstoppers





Hands Across the River Coalition will have monthly meeting Wednesday, September 30

The meeting will be from 6:00-7:45 p.m. at the Millicent Library

Local environmental advocacy group Hands Across the River Coalition, Inc. meets monthly with the next meeting taking place Wednesday, September 30, 2015 from 6:00-7:45 p.m. at the Millicent Library, Fairhaven, MA. Open to the public. Attendees are advised to use the Walnut Street entrance on lower level.


Hands Across the River Coalition advocates for the safe cleanup of New Bedford Harbor and other contaminated sites in the Greater New Bedford area. The group provides information about the detrimental health effects caused to our community from toxic chemicals i.e. PCBs, DIOXIN, mercury, lead and others. HARC was officially formed in 1982. The actual group began years before in anticipation of the Acushnet River environmental contamination cleanup that needed to be done for the protection of human health.

HARC’s primary goal is to ensure the health-conscious clean up of the Acushnet River which runs through New Bedford Harbor into Buzzards Bay, to monitor and advocate for the total preservation of said body of water and shoreline, educate the community about the health effects of toxic chemicals in our environment, to obtain environmental justice for generations now and in the future and to ensure a quality environment, forever, through its efforts. 



The Acushnet River was known to be the #1 most PCB contaminated river in the world.
Concerns about fish consumption with PCB contaminated fish prompted the EPA to designate this site as the “New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site”. It is the largest Superfund site in all of New England.
 
Through years of hard work from HARC’s 600 members and community groups against the EPA, who initially planned to incinerate the PCBs near the shoreline in New Bedford, the court finally stopped the EPA’s incineration plan. After that, a full scale, hydraulic dredging in the upper harbor of the Acushnet River, began in September of 2004 with PCB sediments brought to an off-site TSCA approved landfill in Michigan.
 
Now, the EPA, although continuing with offsite disposal of PCB sediments from the upper harbor, is also planning to bury 300,000 cubic yards of PCBs in the lower harbor near a residential area and high school in Fairhaven, MA . This is the first time in the country that the EPA plans to bury deadly PCB sediments dangerously close to residents. This is our fight today.
 


Hands Across the River Coalition, Inc. appeals to everyone to join them in working to protect our air, soil and water, and especially, the public’s health by removing PCBs safely to an offsite TSCA, (Toxic Substances Control Act), approved landfill.





Massachusetts State Police Statement on Baby Bella: The Mission is Not Done

Baby Bella’s body was found on the shoreline of Deer Island on the afternoon of June 25.

The arraignments in Dorchester District Court of the two defendants charged in Baby Bella’s death were held today. MICHAEL McCARTHY, 35, who is the boyfriend of Bella’s mother, is charged with murder and was held without bail. RACHELLE BOND, 40, Bella’s mother, is charged with accessory to murder after the fact and was ordered held on $1 million cash bail. Both are also charged with improper disposal of human remains.

Suffolk County Assistant District Attorney David Deakin told the court that State Police detectives learned that McCARTHY killed the baby in the little girl’s bedroom in late May, and that he then put her body in a bag and put her into a refrigerator, where she stayed for nearly a month. McCARTHY and BOND are then accused of putting the baby’s body in Boston Harbor from a point in South Boston in late June.

Baby Bella’s body was found on the shoreline of Deer Island on the afternoon of June 25. For nearly three months, as investigators from the State Police Detective Unit for Suffolk County followed up hundreds of leads about missing children, BOND never reported that her daughter had been killed. Leads were chased down throughout Massachusetts, in 35 other states, and several foreign countries. Advanced forensic testing was conducted, including tests on pollen in her hair and isotopes in her hair and teeth, in the hope of learning where she had lived throughout her short life. A mitochondrial DNA profile — the most sophisticated type of DNA profile — was created in the hope that if a close adult relative had a DNA sample on file, our little girl’s DNA could be matched to it.

These efforts continued, week after week after week.

State Police investigators broke the case last week when they learned that following: A man who knew BOND asked her about her daughter. BOND made admissions to that man that the child had been killed. That man then relayed that information to his sister. The man and his sister referenced online information about the ongoing efforts to identify the toddler found on Deer Island and saw the composite image of the baby that had been widely publicized. The suspicions that the young girl, popularly referred to as Baby Doe, was in fact Bella were passed along to the State Police Detective Unit last Wednesday night.

State Police investigators on Thursday went to BOND’s apartment at 115 Maxwell St. in Boston’s Mattapan neighborhood. No one answered the door. They made entry to conduct a well-being check and, upon making observations, immediately realized they were in the place where Baby Doe had lived.

Troopers immediately secured the apartment and obtained a search warrant, which was executed over several hours Thursday night. Items of potential evidentiary value were seized. By Friday morning, State Police detectives had determined that McCARTHY was at Beth Israel Hospital for a medical procedure, and that BOND was at a residence in Lynn. Both were located and placed into custody.

The Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit did outstanding, tireless work on this heartbreaking case, and the fact that we are in a position to seek justice for Bella is due to this extremely talented and dedicated group of investigators. We are grateful to them and to ADA Deakin and his colleagues for their unbreakable commitment to get to the truth about who this young girl was and how she died.

We also recognize the important contributions of our Crime Scene Services Section, our K9 Section, and our dive team, who assisted at the scene the day we found Bella. We also note the fine work done by our Forensic Services Group in analyzing evidence recovered that day.

We thank the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children for their invaluable assistance. NCMEC was with us, offering advice and help, every step of the way. We thank the Winthrop Police for their critical assistance, and every other police department in the United States and other countries who helped conduct well-being checks. We are also grateful for the expertise of several outside laboratories, including scientists from the Customs and Border Protection agency, the University of North Texas, and IsoForensics Inc. in Utah.

We are grateful, too, to the Massachusetts Department of Transportation and ClearChannel Outdoor, for allowing us to post the composite image of the little girl we would eventually come to know as Bella on more than 90 billboards around the state.

And we thank all of you who submitted tips and expressed support to our investigators throughout these last 12 weeks. The depth of your concern and compassion for this little girl is beyond words.

The job is not done.

The Massachusetts State Police will continue to work with the Suffolk District Attorney throughout the prosecution to ensure that Bella’s voice, silenced by these two defendants, is heard again before the law. Ahead of us now is the completion of several remaining investigative tasks and assisting prosecutors in preparing the case for trial.

The arrests do not mark the end of our determination to speak for Bella. That mission continues, and we march on, and it will not end until we secure justice for this innocent child.


Translate »