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Tips for charity at Mary’s Hot Dogs in New Bedford

Small business owners are the backbone of any community. Small businesses that give back to the community are the heart of the community and seem to thrive. Mary’s Mini Dogs has quickly become the heart of the north end of New Bedford.

One of New Bedford’s newest businesses, Mary’s Mini-Dogs on 2112 Acushnet Ave. in the north end of New Bedford, immediately started giving back and has made giving back to the community a daily task.

While tips are not expected, any tips received are donated to local non-profits. Every 30 days, Mary’s chooses a different local, non-profit organization and donates every penny to that organization.

In the first 30 days of tips, Mary’s donated $310.73 to a local Boy Scout troop. This month, tips are being donated to the Greater New Bedford Special Olympics. The next two non-profits are New Bedford Guide Scholarship fund (coming soon!) and Odie’s Place Animal Shelter.

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On Super Bowl Sunday, Mary’s prepared hot dogs for 109 on duty police officers and fire fighters in New Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet and Freetown.



“Mary’s” also donated a percentage of sales for two days towards the fundraiser of Tricia and Victoria Fernandes’ Polar Plunge for Special Olympics. The plunge is on February 28, 2015. https://www.kintera.org/faf/donorReg/donorPledge.asp?ievent=1122675&supId=417036071. Mary’s has also made food donations of hot dogs, rolls and chips to Mercy Meals and cold cuts and cheese to Harbour House Family Shelter.

On Super Bowl Sunday, Mary’s prepared hot dogs for 109 on duty police officers and firefighters in New Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet and Freetown. The owner, Mary Hocking, asked for volunteers to deliver the hot dogs to each station and received an overwhelming response from the community. Twelve people delivered hot dogs to 16 police and fire stations. The volunteers were Debra Andre, Michelle Lafrance, Katie Ann Doyle, Paul Lopes, Gina Farizo, Lori Anne, Justine Reed, Brittany Michelle, Kathy Lopes, Pearl Lee Monteiro, Cathy Silva and Robin Quinn.

Mary’s is a welcomed business in the north end of New Bedford. Stop by soon to enjoy a delicious meal and tip generously knowing that 100% of the tip money will go to a great local cause.

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New Bedford citywide parking ban lifted at 7PM

A Winter Storm Warning remains in effect for Southern Bristol County, including the City of New Bedford until 1AM on Tuesday.

Temperatures are dropping quickly as heavy snow is expected to continue for the next several hours before tapering off to light snow through into tonight.

Motorists and pedestrians are urged to slow down and use extreme caution this afternoon and evening due to reduced visibilities and flash freeze conditions

Citywide Snow Emergency Parking Ban Lifted at 7PM Tonight, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015
Officials have announced that the Citywide Snow Emergency Parking Ban will be lifted this evening as of 7PM.

SRTA Service Ending Early Today, Monday, February 2, 2015
The Southeastern Regional Transit Authority has announced it will suspend service early this evening in anticipation of road icing and poor visibilities. SRTA has announced a list of final route pick-ups before ceasing service later this evening. Riders should call (508) 999-5211 for information about the status of SRTA services. For more details, please visit www.srtabus.com.

New Bedford Public Schools Open Tomorrow, Tuesday, February 3, 2015
All New Bedford Public Schools will reopen tomorrow, Tuesday, February 3, 2015.

New Bedford City Offices Open Tomorrow, Tuesday, February 3, 2015
City offices will reopen tomorrow, Tuesday, February 3, 2015 including City Hall, the public libraries, senior centers and the Buttonwood Park Zoo. New Bedford Regional Airport is closed for snow removal operations and is planning to reopen tomorrow morning. Passengers should contact their air carriers directly to confirm their flight status.

One-Day Delay of Residential Trash Collection
No residential trash was collected today, Monday, February 2, 2015. ABC Disposal will be operating on a one-day delay schedule for this week. Therefore, residents whose normal trash collection day is Monday should put their trash out curbside for collection tomorrow, Tuesday. Residents whose normal collection day is Tuesday will put their trash curbside on Wednesday. Residents whose normal collection day is Wednesday will put their trash curbside on Thursday. Residents whose normal collection day is Thursday will put their trash curbside on Friday. Residents whose normal collection day is Friday will put their trash curbside on Saturday.

Pilgrim United Church Remains Open for Residents in Need of Shelter
Pilgrim United Church (634 Purchase Street) remains open for unsheltered residents. The church is equipped with staff, food and cots.

Sand Available to City Residents at Various Locations
The Department of Public Infrastructure has made sand available to city residents at many locations throughout the city. Residents are advised to bring their own small container to collect the sand at any of the following locations:

 

  • Norfolk St & Acushnet Ave
  • Toby St & Acushnet Ave
  • Manila St & Acushnet Ave
  • Fire Station #5 –Acushnet Ave
  • Phillips Rd & Pine Hill Dr
  • Welby Rd, North Side, Between Two Buildings
  • Essex St & Phillips Rd, Campbell School
  • Saint Theresa’s Church – Acushnet Ave
  • Balls Corner, Mill Rd & Belleville Ave
  • Saint Mary’s School/Church –Illinois St
  • Tarkiln Hill Rd & Acushnet Ave
  • Police Station #3 – Ashley Blvd
  • Wilks Library –Acushnet Ave & Princeton St
  • Ashley Blvd & Princeton St
  • Belleville Rd & Hope St
  • Mount Pleasant St on Nash Rd Side (in place)
  • Fire Station –Davis St & Acushnet Ave
  • Deane St & Ashley Blvd
  • Bullard St & Acushnet Ave
  • Shawmut Diner, Between the Driveways
  • Acushnet Ave & Sawyer St
  • Sawyer St & Mount Pleasant St
  • Beetle St & North Front St
  • Beetle St & N. Front St
  • Coggeshall St & Ashley Blvd
  • Coggeshall & Purchase St
  • 10 Kilburn St
  • Purchase St & Logan St
  • Rockdale Ave & Granit St
  • Linden St & County St, South Side of Linden St
  • Fire Station #7 –Durfee St & Cottage St
  • Durfee St & Shawmut Ave
  • Red Cross, Rockdale Ave & Durfee St
  • Purchase St & Wamsutta Ave
  • Sacred Heart Nursing Home, Studley St & Summer St, On West Side
  • Merrimac St & County St
  • 1554 Purchase St, Fire Repair
  • Pleasant St & Pope St
  • Parker St & County St, East Side of County St
  • Parker St & Rockdale Ave
  • Pleasant St & Pearl St
  • Purchase St & Campbell St
  • Cottage St & Campbell St
  • Sycamore St & State St
  • County St & Sycamore St
  • Pleasant St, Rear Lot of Fire Prevention
  • Maxfield St & Pleasant St
  • E.M.T.S. Chancery St, Inside Parking Area
  • S.E.C. Summer St & Hillman St
  • Ash St & Hillman St
  • Fire Station #2 –Pleasant St
  • County St & North St
  • Pope’s Island Marina
  • Third District Court, North Side of Kempton St
  • Liberty St & Kempton St
  • Pleasant St & Middle St
  • South Sixth St & Middle St
  • County St & Middle St
  • Elm St Garage, On Acushnet Ave
  • Buttonwood Library
  • Pier 3 –Visitors Center
  • South Water & Hamilton St
  • William St & Acushnet Ave, Custom House Square
  • City Hall, Pleasant St Side
  • Centre St & Front St
  • Market St & Sixth St
  • Second St & Union St
  • Union St & Acushnet Ave
  • Purchase St & Union St
  • Eighth St and Union St
  • County St & Union St
  • Spring St & Pleasant St
  • Zeiterion Garage, Acushnet Ave Entrance
  • School St & Purchase St
  • School St & Sixth St
  • School St & County St
  • Walnut St & Acushnet Ave
  • Maple St & Atlantic St
  • Maple St & Reed St
  • Madison St & County St
  • Fire Museum, Bedford St & Sixth St
  • Page St & Bedford St
  • Wing St & Acushnet Ave
  • Wing St & County St
  • Fair St & County St
  • Fire Station #6, Purchase St
  • Thompson St & Crapo St
  • County St & Rivet St
  • Bonney St & Rivet St
  • Bolton St & Rivet St
  • Delano St & South First St
  • Jouvette St & Bonney St
  • Howland Green Library, Driveway, Rodney French Blvd
  • Rockdale Ave & Dartmouth St
  • Fire Station #11, Brock Ave & Mott St
  • Willard St & West Rodney French Blvd
  • Clegg Field, Brock Ave
  • Brock Ave & Portland St
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant, Community Center
  • South Rodney French Blvd, Cable Access Building

 




C&R Appliances – new & used Scratch and Dent shop doing big business in a small town way!

One-man show Cliff Rose is always offloading, repairing or tinkering.

Who doesn’t love a local-yokel story? A tale about a person everyone in town likes, knows, and trusts. A simple fellow whose word and handshake is enough for a deal? Someone with old-world ideals and business practices? Who should be offering products and services at a higher price, but is just a good guy and can’t help himself?

Cliff Rose, born and raised on Long Pond, is a veritable one-man show: the owner, repairman, technician, salesman, and all-around loved local-yokel of C&R Appliances Unlimited – a new, used and Scratch and Dent Appliances shop located in the Old Goodhue Lumber Building. You know, one of those places where there is a dent – sometimes a scratch that can barely be seen – causes the big stores to junk it as unsaleable?

Cliff’s friend Dave standing at the back of the open truck.

Sounds crazy, but the big chains actually “throw” these items away and folks like Cliff grab them for incredibly cheap – which is great news for regular people like you and I, or people who are frugal and thrifty.

Two decades ago, Cliff was working for a recycling company and was downright shocked when he saw what was being thrown away. Some of the appliances he was coming across that were to be tossed were better than what he had in his own house! So with this in mind, C&R Appliances was born. Cliff is usually so busy in the backroom, unloading new inventory or repairing something, that locals like Betsy will come in, put some wood in the wood stove, brew some coffee and “hang out.” By hang out, I mean manage the shop! He has no permanent employees – family and friends, stop in to chat and just help out. In fact, Betsy puts in some solid hours, so she has a place to sew.

That’s a small town business model, that you rarely if at all see any more. Locals pulling together to help one another out, because…well, that’s what people do, right?

Finding a perfectly new refrigerator, dishwasher, washing machine, etc. for 50% or more off the regular price is pretty common at C&R. And if steep discounts like that aren’t enough for you, there are appliances that are used, broken and thrown away that Cliff reconditions. Since he paid very little for the used items and only invested a few hours of labor and some parts, you get solid appliances backed by Cliff’s know-how – which he backs up with a 90 day guarantee. So whether new or used, it’s affordable.

One can find beauties like these stainless steel refrigerators for up to 50% off from what you would see at chain stores – with no difference but perhaps a scratch.

On top of that, if Cliff doesn’t have something you are looking for – he’ll find it. He is out looking for new stock daily, and can often find you what you are looking for within a day, and sometimes the same day! He offers the same service whether you are the owner of rental properties and need a twenty dishwashers or just a regular joe looking for a microwave.

Not only does C&R Appliances offer appliances, but Cliff repairs them as well. However, Cliff is so busy and as I mentioned, he is a one-man show, you will have to deal with repairs at a small-town speed. Having said that, if you want to save an arm and a leg and have patience – you can wait a day or two – then, it’s a no-brainer. Go with the small town!

I asked Cliff why he would be way out in the “boonies” instead of places with high traffic like Dartmouth and New Bedford and his reply was a simple, practical one “I was born and raised here. I’m raising my son Tylah here. Besides, the shop is close to the pond – I can do some jet skiing or speed boating.”

So what kind of things will you come across on a visit? How about a 4 piece kitchen set – Bisque electric stove, 15 cu.ft. refrigerator, a dishwasher and microwave for $600? Not a misprint! $600! Best of all, since Cliff dismantles, cleans, and repairs every single item before it goes on the showroom floor you get the 90-day guarantee. He knows the appliance inside and out and is confident enough to back it up. “Nothing goes out on the floor unless I would put it in my home.” That’s a darn good measuring stick. Simple business maxims like that are why C&R has been so successful for twenty years, solely on word of mouth and no advertising.

Cliff’s son Dave Barlow is reconditioning a newly arrived machine.

This is why in that twenty year time frame, Cliff’s customer’s children grow up to become new customers.

So if you want affordable prices on appliances and repairs by people like you and I, with no sales pitches, by a local, small business then there is no better place than C&R. In a small town like East Freetown, word gets around fast – there’s no hiding from reputation built on honesty and quality service or dishonesty and poor service. Your neighbors are your customers. You’re in a boatload of trouble if you do the wrong things, and inversely if you are doing the right thing, everyone will know about it. Luckily for those of us in the South Coast, Cliff has been doing the right thing for twenty years.

Just ask around – or head in and warm yourself near the wood stove. Ask for Betsy, Cliff or whomever is brewing the coffee that day.


Here’s a fine example of one of the deals C&R Appliances offers on a set:

4-piece kitchen set: microwave, dishwasher, stove AND refrigerator: $600!


C&R Appliances Unlimited
182 Middleboro Rd
East Freetown, Massachusetts 02717
Phone: 508.876.3772 or 774.849.4888
Open weekdays from 9-5 and Saturday from 8-2.
Facebook: facebook.com/Co130631


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New Bedford Announces Parking Ban Effective Midnight on Sunday

The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Storm Watch for Southern Bristol County, including the City of New Bedford, effective from 9PM Sunday evening through 1AM on Tuesday. A Winter Storm Watch is issued for the potential of accumulating snow of 6 or more inches in a 12 hour period or, 8 or more inches in a 24-hour period.

According to the National Weather Service, heavy snow along with a period of sleet and freezing rain is expected to develop after midnight Sunday night. Snow will fall heavy at times, at the rate of 1-2 inches per hour. Total snow accumulation of 5-9 inches is possible along with a trace of ice accretion.

Citywide Snow Emergency Parking Ban Effective Midnight on Sunday, Feb. 1, 2015
In preparation for the approaching winter storm, the City of New Bedford has announced a citywide snow emergency parking ban to take effect at midnight on Sunday, February 1, 2015. The parking ban will be strictly enforced and will remain in effect for 48-hours thereafter, unless lifted or further extended by City officials. The parking ban is designed to allow City workers to efficiently remove snow from New Bedford roadways to allow public safety vehicles and residents to travel safely.

While the snow emergency parking ban is in effect, parking is permitted on the side of the street that is opposite the fire hydrants. No vehicle should be parked on the same side of the street as a fire hydrant, except on streets that are regularly posted for parking on one side of the street only. In posted areas, residents are to obey the signs as usual.

The citywide parking ban will be double-sided in both the Acushnet Avenue Business District and the Downtown Business District. Downtown parking is available at no charge in the Elm Street and the Zeiterion Parking Garages.

Violations of this parking regulation will be subject to ticketing at $50 per ticket and towing at full cost to the owner of the vehicle towed. The vehicle owner is also responsible for the full cost of storage for any towed vehicle.

The City of New Bedford has designated the following areas as preferred parking areas for those residents in need of off-street parking while the emergency snow parking ban is in effect:
· Victory Park – Brock Avenue
· Hazelwood Park – Brock Avenue
· Cove Street Parking Lot – Cove Street and Morton Court
· Orchard Street at Camara Soccer Field
· Buttonwood Park Parking Area – Hawthorn Street Side and Lake Street Side
· Former St. Mary’s Home – Entrance on Mill Street
· Coggeshall Street Parking Lot – Coggeshall Street and Acushnet Avenue
· Sawyer Street Parking Lot – Between Sawyer Street and Beetle Street
· Brooklawn Park Parking Area – Brooklawn Street (South Side)
· Riverside Park Lot – Coffin Avenue
· Coffin Avenue Lot- Across from Taber Mills Apartments
· Alma del Mar Charter School (former Ottiwell School) – 26 Madeira Avenue
· Former AVX site on Bellville Avenue at Hadley Street
· Former Philips Avenue School – 249 Phillips Avenue
· Elm Street Garage
· Zeiterion Garage – 688 Purchase Street
· New Bedford High School – 230 Hathaway Boulevard
· Keith Middle School – 225 Hathaway Boulevard
· Normandin Middle School – 81 Felton Street
· Roosevelt Middle School – 119 Fredrick Street
· Charles S Ashley Elementary School – 122 Rochambeau Street
· Elizabeth Carter Brooks Elementary School – 212 Nemasket Street
· Elwyn G Campbell Elementary School – 145 Essex Street
· Sgt Wm H Carney Acad Elementary School – 247 Elm Street
· James B Congdon Elementary School – 50 Hemlock Street
· John B DeValles Elementary School – 120 Katherine Street
· Alfred J Gomes Elementary School – 286 South Second Street
· Ellen R Hathaway Elementary School – 256 Court Street
· Hayden/McFadden Elementary School – 361 Cedar Grove Street
· Horatio A Kempton Elementary School – 135 Shawmut Avenue
· Abraham Lincoln Elementary School – 445 Ashley Boulevard
· Carlos Pacheco Elementary School – 261 Mt. Pleasant Street
· John Avery Parker Elementary School – 705 County Street
· Casmir Pulaski Elementary School – 1097 Braley Road
· Thomas R Rodman Elementary School – 497 Mill Street
· William H Taylor Elementary School – 620 Brock Avenue
· SEA LAB/John Hannigan Elementary School – 91 Portland Street
· Jireh Swift Elementary School – 2203 Acushnet Avenue
· Betsey B Winslow Elementary School – 561 Allen Street

Pilgrim United Church Remains Open for Residents in Need of Shelter
Pilgrim United Church (634 Purchase Street) will remain open for unsheltered residents. The church is equipped with staff, food and cots.

Sand Available to City Residents at Various Locations
The Department of Public Infrastructure has made sand available to city residents at many locations throughout the city. Residents are advised to bring their own small container to collect the sand at any of the following locations:

  • Norfolk St & Acushnet Ave
  • Toby St & Acushnet Ave
  • Manila St & Acushnet Ave
  • Fire Station #5 –Acushnet Ave
  • Phillips Rd & Pine Hill Dr
  • Welby Rd, North Side, Between Two Buildings
  • Essex St & Phillips Rd, Campbell School
  • Saint Theresa’s Church – Acushnet Ave
  • Balls Corner, Mill Rd & Belleville Ave
  • Saint Mary’s School/Church –Illinois St
  • Tarkiln Hill Rd & Acushnet Ave
  • Police Station #3 – Ashley Blvd
  • Wilks Library –Acushnet Ave & Princeton St
  • Ashley Blvd & Princeton St
  • Belleville Rd & Hope St
  • Mount Pleasant St on Nash Rd Side (in place)
  • Fire Station –Davis St & Acushnet Ave
  • Deane St & Ashley Blvd
  • Bullard St & Acushnet Ave
  • Shawmut Diner, Between the Driveways
  • Acushnet Ave & Sawyer St
  • Sawyer St & Mount Pleasant St
  • Beetle St & North Front St
  • Beetle St & N. Front St
  • Coggeshall St & Ashley Blvd
  • Coggeshall & Purchase St
  • 10 Kilburn St
  • Purchase St & Logan St
  • Rockdale Ave & Granit St
  • Linden St & County St, South Side of Linden St
  • Fire Station #7 –Durfee St & Cottage St
  • Durfee St & Shawmut Ave
  • Red Cross, Rockdale Ave & Durfee St
  • Purchase St & Wamsutta Ave
  • Sacred Heart Nursing Home, Studley St & Summer St, On West Side
  • Merrimac St & County St
  • 1554 Purchase St, Fire Repair
  • Pleasant St & Pope St
  • Parker St & County St, East Side of County St
  • Parker St & Rockdale Ave
  • Pleasant St & Pearl St
  • Purchase St & Campbell St
  • Cottage St & Campbell St
  • Sycamore St & State St
  • County St & Sycamore St
  • Pleasant St, Rear Lot of Fire Prevention
  • Maxfield St & Pleasant St
  • E.M.T.S. Chancery St, Inside Parking Area
  • S.E.C. Summer St & Hillman St
  • Ash St & Hillman St
  • Fire Station #2 –Pleasant St
  • County St & North St
  • Pope’s Island Marina
  • Third District Court, North Side of Kempton St
  • Liberty St & Kempton St
  • Pleasant St & Middle St
  • South Sixth St & Middle St
  • County St & Middle St
  • Elm St Garage, On Acushnet Ave
  • Buttonwood Library
  • Pier 3 –Visitors Center
  • South Water & Hamilton St
  • William St & Acushnet Ave, Custom House Square
  • City Hall, Pleasant St Side
  • Centre St & Front St
  • Market St & Sixth St
  • Second St & Union St
  • Union St & Acushnet Ave
  • Purchase St & Union St
  • Eighth St and Union St
  • County St & Union St
  • Spring St & Pleasant St
  • Zeiterion Garage, Acushnet Ave Entrance
  • School St & Purchase St
  • School St & Sixth St
  • School St & County St
  • Walnut St & Acushnet Ave
  • Maple St & Atlantic St
  • Maple St & Reed St
  • Madison St & County St
  • Fire Museum, Bedford St & Sixth St
  • Page St & Bedford St
  • Wing St & Acushnet Ave
  • Wing St & County St
  • Fair St & County St
  • Fire Station #6, Purchase St
  • Thompson St & Crapo St
  • County St & Rivet St
  • Bonney St & Rivet St
  • Bolton St & Rivet St
  • Delano St & South First St
  • Jouvette St & Bonney St
  • Howland Green Library, Driveway, Rodney French Blvd
  • Rockdale Ave & Dartmouth St
  • Fire Station #11, Brock Ave & Mott St
  • Willard St & West Rodney French Blvd
  • Clegg Field, Brock Ave
  • Brock Ave & Portland St
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant, Community Center
  • South Rodney French Blvd, Cable Access Building

 




Homes For Heroes program provides home savings to South Coast’s heroes

The people behind the Homes For Heroes program in the South Coast, Brian Clay and Max Carey in their self-described “cheesy photo that looks like we are auditioning for Anchorman 3” photo.

The events of 9/11 demonstrated the worst and best of humanity. While the actions that initiated the event were one of the worst acts in contemporary history, they also inspired and brought out the best we are capable of. Stories abound of compassion, empathy, and sacrifice. Strangers helping strangers because its simply the right thing to do.

Now, over a decade later we are still discussing that day and people are still doing good things. One of these is a program called Homes For Heroes – inspired by the sacrifice that men in uniform demonstrated on that infamous day. The program’s objective is to offer substantial rebates or discounts to men and women in uniform – police, firefighters, military personnel including veterans – who are looking to purchase, sell, or refinance a home. Since it’s inception over a decade ago, it has grown to include teachers and health care workers.

The savings are offered by select real estate agents – one agency per region. In the South Coast, the program is offered by New Bedford resident Brian Clay and “Fairhaven-ite” Max Carey of Keller Williams – whom I applaud, because this program is something that a real estate agency can thrive without.

Matt and Caroline Lee with Brian and Max after receiving over $2,500!

These experienced, successful realtors certainly don’t need to offer a program like this. It’s not necessary or fundamental to their success – but they choose and want to do this because they were equally inspired and motivated by the stories that came out during 9/11. So when veteran Tim Barr of Homestead Mortgage approached them in 2014, they jumped at the chance to bring this wonderful program to the South Coast.

If you spend just a few minutes with either Brian or Max, you can see what type of people they are. They would promote a program like this, if they were plumbers, mayors, or homeless. They are just good, down-to-earth people who want to give back to the community. I see this type of business model more and more. Gone are the days of the aggressive guerrilla marketing and making someone wear a pizza suit and flag down cars. America is slowly making a return to relationship-based business. A hand shake, word is bond, call me by my first name type of relationship.

Brian and Max epitomize this business model and are quite serious about reaching heroes and getting these savings to them. Yes, they will connect with more people and garner more business from it, but the fact that they are starting out marketing their business by FIRST spreading the Home For Heroes program speaks volumes about who they are and how they do things.

How the program works is simple: if you are one of the aforementioned people, register on Homes For Heroes website. It’s free and there are no hidden charges. A real estate or loan specialist will contact you – in this case Brian or Max. If you qualify, you receive one or more of the following:

  • TA 25% rebate, at closing, from the real estate Affiliate’s company’s gross commission.
  • Discounted lending fees charged by Homes for Heroes® lender affiliates.
  • Title Closing Fee discounts where allowed by law.
  • Other Real Estate Related Discounts available in some States.

The Homes For Heroes program was inspired by the events of 9/11.

Such a simple, effortless process that takes, literally one minute and you are rewarded thousands of dollars. Dollars that can be spent on better quality items for your home, or perhaps some appliances or decorations that turn your house into a home. Heck, that’s gas for a year…er…a day.

The program since Brian and Max have offered it, has reached hundreds of people and when they were asked to share their story, they did so eagerly. In fact, I was overwhelmed with the responses and can’t share them all. They have plenty of testimonials on the Homes For Heroes page and plenty of photos with people who have gone through the process and saved tons. Most recently:

“Homes for Heroes helped us put down a big down payment and still have over $2,000 in cash back. That helped us renovate the kitchen and update some windows right away. Tim, Brian, and the rest of the team were really helpful and supportive during the entire process.” -Matt and Caroline Lee

Homes For Heroes
Facebook: facebook.com/homesforheroessouthcoast
Website: homesforheroes.com/

Brian Clay Keller Williams real estate page: brianclay.thesteveclayteam.com/
Phone: 508-241-4266
Email: brianclay@thesteveclayteam.com
Max Carey Keller Williams real estate page: maxwellcarey.thesteveclayteam.com/
Phone: 508-971-0294
Email: maxcareykw@gmail.com

Tim Barr – Homestead Mortgage page: facebook.com/TimBarrHomesteadMortgage
Phone: 508-221-4279
Email: tbarr@myhomesteadmortgage.com


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Of Doohickeys, Whippersnappers, and Tomfoolery

One of the more polite versions of “Cup of Joe.” This image has become a popular meme.

Figures of speech, idioms, slang, dialects, creoles, pidgins, and other aspects of language have always intrigued me. I would never call myself a writer, but I am a reader. An avid one. Some of my fondest childhood memories were of being swept away to Mars with Asimov, Hobbiton with Tolkein, or to Puritanical 18th century England with Howard. My family are all readers, so when I was paired with not one, but two excellent English teachers in middle school, I began to get an even greater appreciation for words. Coincidentally both English teachers were named Mr. Carter. Both were master teachers who were clearly passionate about literature and more importantly about enriching young minds and instilling the love of English and languages in general.

I’m assuming that I’m not alone out there and that there are people who enjoy this sort of thing. People who enjoy spelling, grammar, syntax, etymology, and definitions. We are the last bastions of the English language. Logophiles and nerds unite!

Slang, whether proper English or not is one of the largest, most used aspects of the English language.

I grew up in the 1970s, but recall some of the words my parents and grandparents used. I recall men calling other men they didn’t know mac, bub, cat, boss, daddy-o, and pal. Pal is one I have retained and still use pretty often today. It’s supplanted “dude,” for me. Even rarer is the term, coincidentally, “Joe.” Which not only could be used to address someone you didn’t know or just met, but it could also refer to coffee. “I’m heading down to Woolworth’s and going to enjoy a cup of Joe.” Since I enjoy inflicting my poor humor on others, when I’m with older…er…wiser company, I’ll offer them “a cup of me.” Insert drum rim shot here. Go ahead, throw your rotten vegetables. If I haven’t crossed that line yet, then “Take my wife.” Have at me.

The 80s, a particularly rich in slang time period brought us homeslice, homeskillet, bruh, and

Whippersnapper refers to the day when teenagers didn’t rob convenient stores and do heavy drugs, but their crime was throwing those little white baggies that had gunpowder in them. Imagine that? When you saw a kid your primary worry was whether the little puke was going to be a whippersnapper. That’s a much better “-er” than robber, drug abuser, or killer.

When a bunch of boys got together, you better believe there was going to be some tomfoolery, hijinks, or some raising Cain. Of course, if you were a square you wouldn’t have any of that.

These darn whippersnappers and their hijinks!

How about the words invented for slapping temporary fixes or repairs? The Jury-Rig or the Guinea-Rig. Being Italian, the latter one would garner raised eyebrows – but back then people were less sensitive and less eager to cry out “racism” every three minutes.

There were even more words for that tool or object whose name you had forgotten: the doohickey, thingamajig, doodad, thingy, watchamacallit, thingamabob, etc. Funny, thing is that everyone knew exactly what that poorly described thing was.

Money has always been a popular one to give names to. Beyond bucks, we had greenbacks, duckets, moolah, jing, grub, bread, and scratch. “You buying? Because I’m crying.”

Today we have bad, awesome, sick and wicked or mad cool. Yesterday we had capital, top, ace, neat and keen. The 80s brought us rad, gnarly, fresh phat and tubular. Oh, man. The 1980s. They also brought us the opposite of good: grody and bogus.

For girl, we have chick, hottie, bunny and in certain sub-cultures a less savory term and that seems about it. Growing up we had a LOT of terms: dame, broad, bird, skirt, fox or for the less popular ones, skag. Coincidentally, if something wasn’t up to par or was not good, it was “For the birds,” as in “Doing chores is for the birds!”

Well, hope you enjoyed this light-hearted historic stroll. A slight departure from the hard history.

Growing up in the 70s and 80s, I am confident I used every term hdepicted here.

When you meet up with friends in the next few days, feel free to break out some of these old terms and have a laugh. In fact, if you like to torture your teenage son or daughter, like I do, you can wait until he or she is in a group of their peers and say “What’s the word, homeslices? Where the cute birds at?” and when they look at you like you have three heads you can finish, dare I say coup de grace with “Why you guys tripping? Chillax.”





19th Century Perspectives: Ice Harvesting for refrigeration

With this new series of articles, we’re hoping to shed a little light on how things were done in the 19th century. A fun way to lend perspective to our modern way of living. We often hear “You don’t know how good you have it. When I was a kid…” or “You should clear your plate, there are starving kids in Cambodia/Ethiopia.” So this is an attempt to add images and detail to those perspectives – without the hyperbole.

Well, maybe a little bit.

When we peer back into the past and see how things were, we come to appreciate the things we have – perhaps taking them for granted a little less or no more. Of course, I will keep this is local as possible and share any anecdotes I come across in my historical research. While no one today was alive in the 19th century, this is a series on perspectives, so by all means share YOUR story on how things were in the era that you grew up in!


The inaugural article will begin with something we can’t live without and most of us genuinely take for granted. “I love having a refrigerator, it allows me to have refreshingly cold drinks, preserve my food for longer, and allow me to heat my leftovers the next day. Fridges are great!” said no one ever.


Frederic Tudor, the Ice King who started a multi-million dollar industry in the 19th century.

It is also one of those pieces of technology that most of us don’t understand how it works. What is the exact process that allows us a grand luxury? To have a device that we forget exists unless it’s humming in the middle of the night or we lose power? Well you can add that aspect to the list that includes cars (for most of us), radio, TV, microwaves, phones and many more.

Regardless, it’s not important to understand the exact process to appreciate it. The effect of refrigeration on civilization was and is a massive one. Speaking locally or domestically, waterways were the first thing explorers, conquistadors, and settlers looked for. A water source provided sustenance, energy, water for smithing and livestock, etc. Typically food would have to be eaten soon after it was captured.

Refrigeration allowed us to be able to move into isolated areas when it came to settling. One no longer had to live near a waterway to sustain living. One could stockpile enough food that live off of for days or weeks without need to head to the developing areas to re-supply or head back towards a waterway to fish or hunt.

The first known historical reference to refrigeration comes from ancient China’s Shih King period, who referred to “ice cellars.” Subsequently, refrigeration is mentioned in Jewish scripture, by the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans and the Indus Valley.

In the 19th century refrigeration was a booming industry, especially here in New England. In fact, ice harvesting as a commercial business had its start right here in New England. In the start of the 19th century, few people utilized refrigeration because there simply wasn’t a service in place. There were no storehouses to supply the ice, no supply chain, and no personnel to deliver it. It had isolated use by few individuals and certainly wasn’t commonplace.


Andreoly Ice House of New Bedford in 1920. (Spinner Publications)

How the ice harvesting industry got to its booming stage, was by Bostonian Frederic Tudor (1783-1864) also known as the “Ice King.” Tudor was the right man at the right time to kick-start the ice harvesting industry. He was born of a wealthy Boston lawyer and could afford to accrue the initial losses that were certain to come from a new venture.

On a visit to the Caribbean – it’s not known if it was for business or pleasure – he got the bright idea to bring ice to the tropical isles. There was certainly a need for it. He thought back to the many ice ponds back home. In 1806 at the age of 23, he utilized his brig Favorite to take ice from his father’s pond in Saugus, to Martinique. For four years, Tudor was in the red and did not turn a profit. In 1810 he made his first profit and the ice industry began to pick up steam.

Within a few short years he would add Cuba and a number of southern states. As technology advanced and he learned to preserve and cut better, he expanded into Europe and even India and was estimated to be worth $220 million in today’s money. People loved his “crystal blocks of Yankee coldness.”

Ice harvesting was a pretty darn dangerous business from harvesting to icebox. Men would venture out onto frozen ponds with saws, gaffs, tongs and picks and methodically cut and drag blocks. Falling into the water was dangerous enough, but the sharp tools were responsible for the majority of the injuries. Manipulating these heavy blocks of ice came with its own hazards, as did shipping them.


Collage of ice harvesting activities. (Harper’s Weekly)

The process of harvesting, would take dozens of men up to a month. First they would scrape all the snow, leaves and debris off the top. The men would then score a large section called a cutting grid. The cutting grid encompassed that day’s section to be harvested. Then, further score marks of smaller sections would be made and these were called “rafts.” These were rows that ran the length of the cutting grid.

The men would then cut into the rafts of two feet thick ice and pull the ice cakes out, often with the help of horses. A typical ice cake would be 22″ x 32″ to 44″. These were then pulled along with gaffs and floated to the pond’s edge.

These ice cakes, would then go up a chute into the nearby storehouse where more men were waiting to cut them into even smaller sections, depending on existing or expected orders. While the waited delivery the ice cakes would be insulated with saw dust and/or hay.

As you can see, a lot of work (and danger) went into bringing ice to iceboxes in homes across America. One could genuinely appreciate that “simple” ice cake that was brought to your home. I’d imagine that the average person was quite aware of the harvesting process in that day. If they didn’t appreciate because of the labor and risk, the expense of the product and delivery would certainly grab you.

Of course, the cost would go down as the demand went up and technology made the harvesting safer and easier. Today the entire industry has virtually been replaced with the refrigerator. I say, virtually and not entirely, since ice harvesting still takes place in a few areas of the world. In isolated parts of Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire and parts of Canada the ice harvest is a communal event.

The precursor to the refrigerator, the icebox is something that my Nonno and even my mom recalled as a child growing up in the 1950s. Certainly there are some readers that recall using an icebox. We would love to hear your stories!

Refrigeration is a modern convenience that we just can’t live without and certainly one that I take for granted…or took for granted until I wrote this! Now when I go to my refrigerator, I think of Frederic Tudor’s foresight and the thousands of unnamed men who harvested the ice and started an industry.


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Contest: Super Football Scavenger Hunt at Regal House

regal-house-new-bedfordWIN an ASHLEY DURABLEND RECLINER this Saturday and watch the Pats go for it, all in comfort, from Regal House’s FURNITURE and MATTRESS CLEARANCE CENTER on Belleville Ave. in New Bedford’s north end.

How to win: Stop by and count the number of recliners throughout the Clearance Center. Enter your guess on our official registration form (one per person, must be over 18 years of age). The first drawn correct guess wins. It’s that simple. Somebody will take home the fabulous Ashley Durablend Recliner on Sunday, just in time for the Super Bowl! Hint: not all recliners look like recliners.

Scavenger hunt will be held on one day only, Saturday January 31, 2015.

Regal House Furniture and Mattress Clearance Center
661 Belleville Ave. New Bedford.

Winner will be drawn after closing on Saturday and will be notified via Email.

Winner may pick up recliner Sunday February 1, 2015.
No Purchase Necessary.

See complete detail rules at the store.




New Bedford parking ban extended, state of emergency remains in effect

Mayor Jon Mitchell held a press conference today to update city residents on the status of New Bedford’s recovery from the crippling and historic blizzard of January 26-27, 2015. The Mayor announced at a press conference in City Hall this morning that a State of Emergency remains in effect in the City of New Bedford. Over the last two days, blizzard conditions were experienced at many locations in Southern New England including in New Bedford. The National Weather Service has reported that the storm dumped a total of nearly two feet of snow on New Bedford. Drifts on city streets reach as high as six feet in some places.

The National Weather Service defines a blizzard as a snowstorm that reduces visibility to below ¼ mile along with winds that frequently guest to 35mph or more and that these conditions are the predominant reported condition for at least three consecutive hours.

Mayor Mitchell discouraged residents from all unnecessary travel for the remainder of the day to allow city crews to continue to clear the roadways of snow. Residents are being encouraged to report snow removal issues on city streets to the Department of Public Infrastructure (DPI) at (508) 991-6150. The City has also activated a second phone number at (508) 979-1520 to report snow issues. And, residents may report their snow removal issues directly to DPI by emailing Stormcentral@newbedford-ma.gov.

Citywide Snow Emergency Parking Ban Extended to 6 P.M.

Thursday, January 29, 2015 The City of New Bedford has announced a citywide snow emergency parking ban has been extended and will remain in effect until 6 P.M. on Thursday. The parking ban will be strictly enforced. The parking ban is designed to allow City workers to efficiently remove snow from New Bedford roadways to allow public safety vehicles and residents to travel safely.

While the snow emergency parking ban is in effect, parking is permitted on the side of the street that is opposite the fire hydrants. No vehicle should be parked on the same side of the street as a fire hydrant, except on streets that are regularly posted for parking on one side of the street only. In posted areas, residents are to obey the signs as usual.

The citywide parking ban will be double-sided in both the Acushnet Avenue Business District and the Downtown Business District. Downtown parking is available at no charge in the Elm Street and the Zeiterion Parking Garages.

Violations of this parking regulation will be subject to ticketing at $50 per ticket and towing at full cost to the owner of the vehicle towed. The vehicle owner is also responsible for the full cost of storage for any towed vehicle.

The City of New Bedford has designated the following areas as preferred parking areas for those residents in need of off-street parking while the emergency snow parking ban is in effect:

· Victory Park – Brock Avenue
· Hazelwood Park – Brock Avenue
· Roosevelt Middle School – Brock Avenue and Dennis Street
· Cove Street Parking Lot – Cove Street and Morton Court
· Orchard Street at Camara Soccer Field
· Congdon School – Thompson and Hemlock Street
· Buttonwood Park Parking Area – Hawthorn Street Side and Lake Street Side
· Former St. Mary’s Home – Entrance on Mill Street
· Coggeshall Street Parking Lot – Coggeshall Street and Acushnet Avenue
· Sawyer Street Parking Lot – Between Sawyer Street and Beetle Street
· Brooklawn Park Parking Area – Brooklawn Street (South Side)
· Normandin Middle School – Tarkiln Hill Road
· Jireh Swift School – Tarkiln Hill Road
· Campbell School – Phillips Road
· Riverside Park Lot – Coffin Avenue
· Coffin Avenue Lot- Across from Taber Mills Apartments
· Alma del Mar Charter School (former Ottiwell School) – 26 Madeira Avenue
· Former AVX site on Bellville Avenue at Hadley Street
· Philips Avenue School – 249 Phillips Avenue
· DeValles School – 120 Katherine Street
· Parker School – 705 County Street
· Elm Street Garage
· Zeiterion Garage – 688 Purchase Street

New Bedford Public Schools Remain Closed Today, Wednesday, January 28, and Thursday, January 29th 2015
All New Bedford Public Schools and administrative offices are closed today, Wednesday, January 28, 2015.   Superintendent Pia Durkin has CLOSED all New Bedford Public schools for Thursday, 1/29, due to safety considerations and road conditions.

New Bedford City Offices Remain Closed Today, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
City offices will be closed today Wednesday, January 28, 2015 including City Hall, the public libraries, senior centers and the Buttonwood Park Zoo. Only City employees designated as essential should report to work. A decision will be made later today regarding the status of city offices for tomorrow, Thursday, January 29, 2015.

New Bedford Regional Airport will reopen tomorrow as of 7AM Thursday, January 29, 2015. Passengers should contact their air carriers directly to confirm their flight status.

Two-Day Delay in Residential Trash Collection/City Suspends Enforcement of Trash Violations
As previously announced, ABC Disposal will operate trash collection this week on a two-day delay. If your trash is normally collected on Tuesday it will be collected on Thursday, if normally collected on Wednesday it should be set curbside on Friday, if normally collected on Thursday it will be collected on Saturday, if normally collected on Friday it should be set curbside on Sunday.

In addition, the City is temporarily suspending normal enforcement of trash violations through Sunday to provide flexibility for residents regarding trash set outs. The City recognizes it may be difficult for many persons, particularly the elderly, to use their carts this week. Residents are encouraged to use the carts if at all possible; however, residents may set out trash in a bag on their designated collection schedule if necessary.

City Extends Deadline for Payment of Quarterly Tax Bill
Property owners attempting to pay quarterly tax bills are being granted additional time to submit payments. Payments that were previously due on Monday, February 2, 2015 are now due by Friday, February 6, 2015.

Pilgrim United Church Remains Open for Residents in Need of Shelter
Pilgrim United Church (634 Purchase Street) will remain open unsheltered residents. The church is equipped with staff, food and cots.

City Closes Keith Middle School Mass Care Shelter
The Keith Middle School (225 Hathaway Boulevard) which served as the “mass care shelter” for the City of New Bedford has been closed.

SRTA Services Suspended Today, Wednesday, January 28, 2015
The Southeastern Regional Transit Authority has announced that service has been suspended for today, Wednesday, January 28, 2015. A decision will be made later today regarding the status of service for tomorrow. Riders should call (508) 999-5211 for information about the status of SRTA services. For more details visit www.srtabus.com.

Sand Available to City Residents at Various Locations
The Department of Public Infrastructure has made sand available to city residents at many locations throughout the city. Residents are advised to bring their own small container to collect the sand at any of the following locations:

  • Norfolk St & Acushnet Ave
  • Toby St & Acushnet Ave
  • Manila St & Acushnet Ave
  • Fire Station #5 –Acushnet Ave
  • Phillips Rd & Pine Hill Dr
  • Welby Rd, North Side, Between Two Buildings
  • Essex St & Phillips Rd, Campbell School
  • Saint Theresa’s Church – Acushnet Ave
  • Balls Corner, Mill Rd & Belleville Ave
  • Saint Mary’s School/Church –Illinois St
  • Tarkiln Hill Rd & Acushnet Ave
  • Police Station #3 – Ashley Blvd
  • Wilks Library –Acushnet Ave & Princeton St
  • Ashley Blvd & Princeton St
  • Belleville Rd & Hope St
  • Mount Pleasant St on Nash Rd Side (in place)
  • Fire Station –Davis St & Acushnet Ave
  • Deane St & Ashley Blvd
  • Bullard St & Acushnet Ave
  • Shawmut Diner, Between the Driveways
  • Acushnet Ave & Sawyer St
  • Sawyer St & Mount Pleasant St
  • Beetle St & North Front St
  • Beetle St & N. Front St
  • Coggeshall St & Ashley Blvd
  • Coggeshall & Purchase St
  • 10 Kilburn St
  • Purchase St & Logan St
  • Rockdale Ave & Granit St
  • Linden St & County St, South Side of Linden St
  • Fire Station #7 –Durfee St & Cottage St
  • Durfee St & Shawmut Ave
  • Red Cross, Rockdale Ave & Durfee St
  • Purchase St & Wamsutta Ave
  • Sacred Heart Nursing Home, Studley St & Summer St, On West Side
  • Merrimac St & County St
  • 1554 Purchase St, Fire Repair
  • Pleasant St & Pope St
  • Parker St & County St, East Side of County St
  • Parker St & Rockdale Ave
  • Pleasant St & Pearl St
  • Purchase St & Campbell St
  • Cottage St & Campbell St
  • Sycamore St & State St
  • County St & Sycamore St
  • Pleasant St, Rear Lot of Fire Prevention
  • Maxfield St & Pleasant St
  • E.M.T.S. Chancery St, Inside Parking Area
  • S.E.C. Summer St & Hillman St
  • Ash St & Hillman St
  • Fire Station #2 –Pleasant St
  • County St & North St
  • Pope’s Island Marina
  • Third District Court, North Side of Kempton St
  • Liberty St & Kempton St
  • Pleasant St & Middle St
  • South Sixth St & Middle St
  • County St & Middle St
  • Elm St Garage, On Acushnet Ave
  • Buttonwood Library
  • Pier 3 –Visitors Center
  • South Water & Hamilton St
  • William St & Acushnet Ave, Custom House Square
  • City Hall, Pleasant St Side
  • Centre St & Front St
  • Market St & Sixth St
  • Second St & Union St
  • Union St & Acushnet Ave
  • Purchase St & Union St
  • Eighth St and Union St
  • County St & Union St
  • Spring St & Pleasant St
  • Zeiterion Garage, Acushnet Ave Entrance
  • School St & Purchase St
  • School St & Sixth St
  • School St & County St
  • Walnut St & Acushnet Ave
  • Maple St & Atlantic St
  • Maple St & Reed St
  • Madison St & County St
  • Fire Museum, Bedford St & Sixth St
  • Page St & Bedford St
  • Wing St & Acushnet Ave
  • Wing St & County St
  • Fair St & County St
  • Fire Station #6, Purchase St
  • Thompson St & Crapo St
  • County St & Rivet St
  • Bonney St & Rivet St
  • Bolton St & Rivet St
  • Delano St & South First St
  • Jouvette St & Bonney St
  • Howland Green Library, Driveway, Rodney French Blvd
  • Rockdale Ave & Dartmouth St
  • Fire Station #11, Brock Ave & Mott St
  • Willard St & West Rodney French Blvd
  • Clegg Field, Brock Ave
  • Brock Ave & Portland St
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant, Community Center
  • South Rodney French Blvd, Cable Access Building

New Bedford Harbor Hurricane Barrier Navigation Gate
The New Bedford Hurricane Barrier navigation gate is open to marine traffic and no closures are anticipated.

Important Emergency Contact Numbers
· To report a downed power line, medical, fire or other emergencies please dial 911.
· NSTAR is prepared to address and damage and outages resulting from the storm and encourages customers whose electric service is affected to call 1-800-592-2000. NSTAR strongly urges people to stay away from all down wires and to report them immediately.
· To report snow removal issues on city streets, residents may contact the Department of Public Infrastructure at (508) 991-6150. The City has also activated a second phone number at (508) 979-1520 to report snow issues. And, residents may report their snow removal issues directly to DPI at Stormcentral@newbedford-ma.gov.
· New Bedford Police Department may also be reached on its Non-emergency line at (508) 991-6350
· Please visit the City’s website at www.newbedford-ma.gov for more information and
updates from the City of New Bedford regarding the snowstorm.




New Bedford sand pick up locations

The Department of Public Infrastructure has made sand available to city residents at many locations throughout the city. Residents are advised to bring their own small container to collect the sand at any of the following locations:

  • Norfolk St & Acushnet Ave
  • Toby St & Acushnet Ave
  • Manila St & Acushnet Ave
  • Fire Station #5 –Acushnet Ave
  • Phillips Rd & Pine Hill Dr
  • Welby Rd, North Side, Between Two Buildings
  • Essex St & Phillips Rd, Campbell School
  • Saint Theresa’s Church – Acushnet Ave
  • Balls Corner, Mill Rd & Belleville Ave
  • Saint Mary’s School/Church –Illinois St
  • Tarkiln Hill Rd & Acushnet Ave
  • Police Station #3 – Ashley Blvd
  • Wilks Library –Acushnet Ave & Princeton St
  • Ashley Blvd & Princeton St
  • Belleville Rd & Hope St
  • Mount Pleasant St on Nash Rd Side (in place)
  • Fire Station –Davis St & Acushnet Ave
  • Deane St & Ashley Blvd
  • Bullard St & Acushnet Ave
  • Shawmut Diner, Between the Driveway
  • Acushnet Ave & Sawyer St
  • Sawyer St & Mount Pleasant St
  • Beetle St & North Front St
  • Beetle St & N. Front St
  • Coggeshall St & Ashley Blvd
  • Coggeshall & Purchase St
  • 10 Kilburn St
  • Purchase St & Logan St
  • Rockdale Ave & Granit St
  • Linden St & County St, South Side of Linden St
  • Fire Station #7 –Durfee St & Cottage St
  • Durfee St & Shawmut Ave
  • Red Cross, Rockdale Ave & Durfee St
  • Purchase St & Wamsutta Ave
  • Sacred Heart Nursing Home, Studley St & Summer St, On West Side
  • Merrimac St & County St
  • 1554 Purchase St, Fire Repair
  • Pleasant St & Pope St
  • Parker St & County St, East Side of County St
  • Parker St & Rockdale Ave
  • Pleasant St & Pearl St
  • Purchase St & Campbell St
  • Cottage St & Campbell St
  • Sycamore St & State St
  • County St & Sycamore St
  • Pleasant St, Rear Lot of Fire Prevention
  • Maxfield St & Pleasant St
  • E.M.T.S. Chancery St, Inside Parking Area
  • S.E.C. Summer St & Hillman St
  • Ash St & Hillman St
  • Fire Station #2 –Pleasant St
  • County St & North St
  • Pope’s Island Marina
  • Third District Court, North Side of Kempton St
  • Liberty St & Kempton St
  • Pleasant St & Middle St
  • South Sixth St & Middle St
  • County St & Middle St
  • Elm St Garage, On Acushnet Ave
  • Buttonwood Library
  • Pier 3 –Visitors Center
  • South Water & Hamilton St
  • William St & Acushnet Ave, Custom House Square
  • City Hall, Pleasant St SideCentre St & Front St
  • Market St & Sixth St
  • Second St & Union St
  • Union St & Acushnet Ave
  • Purchase St & Union St
  • Eighth St and Union St
  • County St & Union St
  • Spring St & Pleasant St
  • Zeiterion Garage, Acushnet Ave Entrance
  • School St & Purchase St
  • School St & Sixth St
  • School St & County St
  • Walnut St & Acushnet Ave
  • Maple St & Atlantic St
  • Maple St & Reed St
  • Madison St & County St
  • Fire Museum, Bedford St & Sixth St
  • Page St & Bedford St
  • Wing St & Acushnet Ave
  • Wing St & County St
  • Fair St & County St
  • Fire Station #6, Purchase St
  • Thompson St & Crapo St
  • County St & Rivet St
  • Bonney St & Rivet St
  • Bolton St & Rivet St
  • Delano St & South First St
  • Jouvette St & Bonney St
  • Howland Green Library, Driveway, Rodney French Blvd
  • Rockdale Ave & Dartmouth St
  • Fire Station #11, Brock Ave & Mott St
  • Willard St & West Rodney French Blvd
  • Clegg Field, Brock Ave
  • Brock Ave & Portland St
  • Wastewater Treatment Plant, Community Center
  • South Rodney French Blvd, Cable Access Building
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