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10 Things To Do This Weekend (Jan 17-Jan 19)

new-bedford-weather

Well, the weather lately has been an odd bird of sorts. Didn’t we just have a huge snowstorm/blizzard and a day with -6 temperatures? Perhaps it was a dream? Hmmm….Anyhow, we won’t have any frigid days this weekend. While the mornings or nights may be somewhat chilly, Friday and Saturday will be in the mid-40s and Sunday a high of 37. I have quite a few friends who consider that t-shirt or even shorts weather. Regardless, the point is that nothing should stop you from heading out or even driving a little to enjoy some great events. Saturday there is a 50% chance of rain.

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar  where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!


Friday, January 17th

Arts & Crafts, games, activities and more during the “Let’s move! Program.

Gallery Opening: Students of Art Teacher Susan Cabral (Dartmouth) (12:00 pm-5:00 pm)
The works of the students of art teacher Susan Cabral will end TODAY. Here’s your last chance to say the fantastic contribution of local kids!

After-School Program for Elementary Kids: Let’s Move… (1:30 pm-4:00 pm)
This free program is for elementary age students on early release Fridays. Students will participate in fun, educational programming taught by staff. Activities include sports, games, arts and crafts, and outdoor nature studies. It is on a first come, first serve basis and will be limited to 30 students. Registration is required.

Parents must provide transportation and children must be picked up no later than 4 pm each day. Program will only be run on days in which the students are in school (no holiday classes). More information in brochure: http://www.newbedford-ma.gov/publicfacilities/parkrecreation/Mccoy_Calendar.pdf

New exhibitions at NB Art Museum: Color Code & Line Drawing (6:00-8:00 pm)
“Color Code,” works by contemporary artists who use vibrant color as the primary expressive element in their work, runs through March 15. “Line Drawings,” exhibit from Maine artist Ellen Wieske of her steel wire quilts and drawings, runs through March. For more information call (508) 961-3072 or click on event title.

Dock-U-Mentaries Film Series: “Red Gold.” (7:00pm)
Filmmakers Ben Knight and Travis Rummel spent 70 days in Bristol Bay documenting the growing unrest among native, commercial and sport fishermen who oppose the construction of Pebble Mine, an open pit copper mine, which would be built at the headwaters of the Kvichak and the Nushagak Rivers in Bristol Bay Alaska, the two largest remaining sockeye salmon runs on the planet. Red Gold is a portrait of a unique way of life that would not exist if the salmon didn’t return with Bristol Bay’s tide. Sarah Schuman, a Bristol Bay cannery worker and activist, will answer questions follow the screening.


Saturday, January 18th

Master Storyteller Len Cabral will wow the whole family! (lencabral.com)

Len Cabral, master storyteller at Studio 105 (Rochester) (10:30 am-11:15 am)
“Len Cabral is a internationally acclaimed storyteller who has been enchanting audiences with his storytelling performances at schools, libraries, museums and festivals since 1976. Len’s strong Cape Verdean ancestry comes alive in his exuberant retelling of African, Cape Verdean, and Caribbean folktales as well as original stories and tales from around the world.”

Tickets are $10.00 adult and $5.00 for kids. Call 508.322.0998. Tickets also available at The Plumb Library in Rochester. Email: studio105pilatesyogawithmarsha@aol.com. Route 105, Rounsville Road @ Plumb Corner Rochester Center.

Farm petting zoo (Swansea) (1:00 pm-2:00 pm)
The January Kids Crew event features a fun and educational traveling petting farm that includes all kinds of baby farm animals. Head to the Swansea mall’s Center Court from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. for your chance to meet a wide variety of animals!

“The Art of Dialogue” (Westport) (5:00-7:00 pm)
“The Art of Dialogue: Discussion and Films with Filmmakers, Authors, Poets and Scientists,” will be presented and a book discussion “Necessary Assets” with author James Ring. FREE. 1 Partners Lane.


Sunday, January 19th

Greater New Bedford Track Club: Sunday Striders (8:00 am)
Sunday Striders, weekly training runs starting at 8 a.m. on Sundays. All levels of ability welcome; non-members are encouraged to join group. Marathon training continues.

When is the last time you enjoyed a live play!!?
Phone: (508) 994-7209. Buttonwood Senior Center, 1 Oneida St. New Bedford.

Your Theatre Inc. “The Little Dog Laughed” (12:00 pm-1:00 pm)
A witty comedy of manners, perception and deception. Tickets, $15 general public, $13 seniors, students and military. For information call (508) 993-0772 or click on event title.

Sunday Afternoon Jazz Live (4:00 pm-7:00 pm)
A fan of Jazz? Head to the Whaler Lounge today! Cost: $10 cover. Days Inn, 500 Hathaway Road.


Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. 





Portuguese Kids Reaching New Audiences

Portuguese kids, from left to right: Al Sardinha, Jay Casimiro, Brian Martins and Derrick DeMelo

by Sheila Martines Pina

They sit directly across from me in the U shaped table layout that you so often find at luncheons and presentations. Amidst the suits and Smartphones they seem slightly out of place and a lot younger than most in attendance. Their work in support of DrugFreeNB will be shown shortly, and they readily admit, this is not their normal audience, but then again, they’re not your normal guys, they’re the PORTUGUESE KIDS!

Friends since their days growing up in Fall River’s Flint neighborhood, “we all went to the same church,” they’ll proudly tell you, the Portuguese Kids have melded their experiences growing up as children of Portuguese immigrants into music, humor, commercials and ultimately success.


So how do four young men go from dreams to reality? Al Sardina, Jay Casimiro, Brian Martins and Derrick DeMelo aka the Portuguese Kids readily admit it’s been a lot of hard work and sacrifice.

“We always loved being funny,” says Derrick DeMelo, “and at BCC we could learn television production for free! So we did.” But the work was time consuming and the “Kids” grew frustrated. At the time they all had full time jobs and other responsibilities. Then Derrick found out about the Improv Asylum in Boston. Founded in 1997 the Asylum offered improv training. “We wanted to move beyond amateur hour in our performances, so we all took classes for a year and a half,” adds Jay Casimiro and a performance career was born that now is a full time job for all four.

Humor with a Portuguese twist!

But they didn’t start as the Portuguese Kids; initially they were known as “Out of the Gutter Comedy” but slowly began to realize that more and more of the sketches they would perform came from their personal experiences growing up in an immigrant Portuguese family. So the Portuguese Kids were born.

“We were bit by the live performing bug,” says Al Sardinha. “Performing for a live audience really puts you in a zone,” echoes Brian Martins. Shows now typically play to full houses as the appeal of their humor continues to broaden. From New England to California to Canada the Portuguese Kids are booked nearly every weekend. This spring they’ll be hosting a cruise to Bermuda.

I wondered if they were ever criticized for their humor which often pokes fun at the Portuguese experience in America, “Some people do,” admitted Derrick, but most take it in the spirit it was meant to be. “A lot of people see Portuguese people one way, we’re fishermen or laborers, we try and show all sides while staying true to the immigrant lifestyle,” adds Brian Martins.

But it’s not always smooth sailing, “One night we played the Eagle in Fall River, for three people,” says Derrick, “and one guy was there just waiting for a ride home and got up and left mid-act.” Another weekend the Kids played to a packed house as the now-closed Café Funchal in New Bedford, the next night they took the same act to Connecticut, and bombed!

The new efforts on behalf of DrugFreeNB came about after a member of the DrugFree Coalition saw an earlier commercial the Kids had made. “We’re looking to reach the 18 – 25 year old demographic and deliver our message, Stop Prescription Addiction” (one of the fastest growing areas of drug abuse in the country), says Carl Alves, head of PAACA in New Bedford and instrumental in the DrugFreeNB coalition. “If you can add a little humor, while still getting your message across and emphasizing the seriousness of the issue, we believe we’ll reach a wider audience.”

The Portuguese kids pack ’em in and fill the house!

The Kids agree, “Adding a little humor is a fine line, but we want to show the answers can come from within, not by taking a little pill.” They hope to produce, and yes, they write, act in and produce all their own material, a series of commercials for radio and television. They admit to being control freaks and are sticklers for retaining editorial control. The DrugFreeNB campaign currently plans to air the commercials on Comcast and on the internet beginning this January.

Ask them the best part of making people laugh as the Portuguese Kids and they, to a man will say the travel and adrenalin of a live performance, the ability to turn their dream into a full time job and living out a passion while showing they are Proud to be Portuguese! “We consider ourselves ambassadors of the Portuguese lifestyle,” Derrick says, (with no small measure of pride.) “We know many people who are noted celebrities who don’t celebrate their Portuguese heritage; we hope to set an example.”

So what does their future hold? They see themselves conveying more of the immigrant experience in America, and adding characters to their sketches that reflect other ethnicities. “We hope to make our message even more universal,” concluded Derrick. TV pilots and web-based series are also under consideration.

And as I got set to leave, having had my questions answered, the Kids surprised me with a request of their own. “Can you mention how handsome we all are?” Always leave them laughing!


For more information on the Portuguese Kids to see their upcoming schedule and sample some of their humor, you can find them on FaceBook at: Portuguese Kids

For more information on DrugFreeNB, their Facebook site is: DrugFreeNB and their website is: drugfreenb.org

And you can follow them on Twitter at: twitter.com/DrugFreeNB





Faced with a potentially violent confrontation, what would you do?

Are you 100% sure you could handle a violent confrontation and come out unscathed?

by Dave Eaton

I have been a fan of the New Bedford Guide long before I started contributing articles to the page. It provides an open forum for the citizens of New Bedford to discuss the issues that are on the minds of its citizens. A recent topic posted to the New Bedford Guide’s Facebook page detailed the concern that a local woman had regarding vehicles driving by her slowly, some several times.

The woman did not feel comfortable with this and wanted to warn other women in the city. I commend this woman with wanting to warn others. Several women responded to her post about having similar experiences in other parts of the city. Many offered opinions about what the woman should have done. The majority of the responses were positive; and it opened the discussion about what to do if faced with this situation.

Several detractors to the woman’s story accused her of overacting. These slow drivers were lost and looking for directions; or they were looking for prostitutes, the comments explained. This may have been the case, but we can’t be so naïve as to eliminate the possibility of assault or kidnapping.

So what could you do if faced with a similar situation?

1. Remember details…if you can.
Sounds pretty simple, right? When I was in high school I participated in the Student Trooper Academy operated by the Massachusetts State Police at their New Braintree barracks. After a long day of training, our supervising Trooper had about fifty of us in formation prior to going to dinner.

Woman often walk to their car alone (Wikipedia)

Off in the distance I could hear the faint sound of car tires screeching. They started to get louder and closer. All of a sudden I heard a car door slam and the sound of gun shots. I turned around to see what the hell was going on and there were three people with guns shooting at me!

Some students ran; some students dropped to the ground; one student hid under a bush. Then the car sped away. A few seconds later a Trooper asked, “What did you see?” It was a drill designed to test what information we could recall under stress. There were about 30 different variations of the incident, from the make and color of the car, how many people were involved, the sex of those involved, how many shots were fired, etc. When something happens without warning, it can be hard to focus and remember the details.

Try to get a description of the driver, the make and color of the vehicle, and any distinctive details about the vehicle. This could be a missing headlight, a bumper sticker, or damage to the vehicle’s door.

2. Carrying a gun isn’t always the answer to staying safe.
I need to address this without turning this article into an argument about gun control. I’ve written several articles about safety and security and there is always someone who responds to the topic with “just carry a gun.” Avoiding sexual assault? Carry a gun. Domestic violence? Carry a gun. Global warming? Carry a gun.

Carrying a firearm isn’t the answer to all of our personal safety issues. I am a hunter. I own several firearms. I have had my Class “A” license to carry a concealed weapon since 2004. How often do I carry? Not often. Why? I don’t have the time to train with my firearm.

Krav Maga N.B. can teach you the awareness and technical tools to survive a violent confrontation

Responsible gun owners train often on how to draw their weapon and fire and do so simulating different scenarios. If you are an inexperienced gun owner you may actually be doing more harm to yourself than good. By introducing a firearm into a violent situation, you have now potentially provided your attacker with a weapon.

Think about how cold it is today. Could you successfully draw your weapon from underneath several layers of clothing if you needed to use it? Law enforcement officers and trained professionals train regularly in the handling and firing of their weapons. Law enforcement officers adhere to the “21 Foot Rule” when dealing with an individual with an edged weapon. The rule basically states that 21 feet is the distance it takes for an average officer to recognize a threat, draw his or her firearm and fire two rounds at center mass before being stabbed.

If someone were to pull up next to you in a vehicle while you were standing on the sidewalk, you may not have the time to react. And if you do, you may not have the time to react successfully. A firearm in the hands of an untrained individual does not guarantee that you will be able to defend yourself.

3. Trust your instincts and use common sense.
It’s number three here, but it should be number one when it comes to safety. We’ve all had that gut feeling before when something just doesn’t feel right. There’s nothing wrong with listening to your gut and being proactive.

Violent crime stats from fbi.gov

The woman who submitted the post did not feel comfortable. She could have entered a public store or building, took her cell phone out and held it in her hand. She could have crossed the street to get away from the person making her feel uncomfortable.

What does every cell phone have these days? A camera. Take a picture of the person or vehicle if possible. It’s a good practice that when you’re walking on a sidewalk, walk on the side of the street that faces oncoming traffic. Especially in this situation, it’s harder for a vehicle to drive up behind you undetected.

4. Don’t get complacent.
This could be for anything we do. We get comfortable in an area and we let our guard down. In no way am I advocating for living scared; just don’t have the “it can’t happen to me/ it can’t happen here” mindset.

Kidnapping has been rampant in South American countries for the past decade. But that could never happen here, right? Three months ago it was discovered in Lawrence, MA that sophisticated kidnapping “crews” similar to those operated by drug cartels in South America were responsible for several kidnappings in broad daylight. Now this is an extreme example, but it raises the simple point: anything can happen so be aware. Live your life as you normally do, just be aware of your surroundings.

Outdoor training when weather is right

5. Have a plan.
Know what you’d do before you’re in this situation. Would you run, hide, fight, yell and scream? Know what you’d do if you had a friend or spouse with you. What would you do if you had a child with you, an elderly parent, or if you were by yourself? It’s as simple as talking about it with family and friends.

If I was walking late at night with a child I’d explain to them that if I happened to get into a fight with someone, run to a well-lit store. If the child is older and can understand, be more specific. Tell them to run to a restaurant, gas station or store. If you have an infant you may not be able to run. You have to stay and fight. What would you do?


There is no definitive right or wrong answers to any situation. Do something, anything! The only wrong answer is not doing anything and waiting until it’s too late.

Krav Maga New Bedford
675 Orchard Street Second Floor
New Bedford, Massachusetts
Phone (508) 259-1592

Email: southcoast@kravmagaboston.com
Website: kravmagaboston.com/
Facebook: facebook.com/KravMagaNewBedford





13 Things To Do This Weekend (Jan 10-Jan 12)

new-bedford-weather

Well, we’ve had quite the odd stretch of weather. From winter storm Hercules dropping up to a foot of snow, to rainy and 52 degrees out, before heading back to freezing temperatures. The chances for rain are 30%, 60%, and 70% for Friday, Saturday and Sunday respectively. Temperatures will be between 41-53 degrees and we will only see below freezing on Sunday morning. I don’t know how to describe this sort of winter weather, but I’m counting the days to Spring!

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar  where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!


Friday, January 10th

Canine scent work for fun (Acushnet) (7:00 pm-8:00 pm)
Scent work uses your dog’s natural instincts of hunting to train him or her to identify and locate specific odors, food or a toy. Sign up early to save your spot in the next course! MJ’s Pet Training Academy at 132 S. Main Street in Acushnet. Register online or contact MJ’s for more details. Phone: 7749926929. Email: mjsdogtraining@gmail.com. Located in The Acushnet Plaza.

Classic Film Fridays (Marion) (7:00 pm-8:00 pm)
Sippican Historical Society with the Marion Council on Aging presents the film “All The President’s Men.” Part of Classic Film Fridays. FREE and open to the public. For more information contact SHS at (508) 748-1116. Marion Music Hall, 164 Front St.

Professor Louie and The Cromatix (Fall River) (8:00 pm-9:00 pm)
Narrows Center For the Arts presents Professor Louie and The Cromatix and The Rock Of Ages Horn Section play the music of The Band.


Saturday, January 11th

Rug Braiding workshop (Middleboro) (10:30 am-11:30 am)
All skill levels are invited to participate as Mary Guidoboni teaches the art of rug braiding during three consecutive Saturdays (JAN 11, 18, JAN 25).

Learn the lost art of rug braiding! (soulehomestead.org)

Beginners will learn to hand-braid wool from old blankets, skirts and coats; intermediate and advanced students may bring their ongoing projects. New students must attend the first workshop and are encouraged to attend all three to benefit. $10 for members, $15 for non-members, $5 for students returning from past workshops. For a full list of activities and more information, call (508) 947-6744 or click on event title.

Chess Club (Mattapoisett) (2:00 pm-2:45pm)
Chess Club– ages 5 & up. See Mrs. Burke to sign up. Mattapoisett Library , 7 Barstow St. Mattapoisett.

WLCT “Wild Winter Talks” (Westport) (2:00-3:00 pm)
Westport Land Conservation Trust presents a “Wild Winter Talks” lecture series with “The Trees CAN Speak,” presented by WLCT Executive Director, Ryan Mann. All talks are free and take place at the Westport Library. For information call (508) 636-3643. 408 Old County Road.

“The Art of Dialogue” (Westport) (5:00-7:00 pm)
“The Art of Dialogue: Discussion and Films with Filmmakers, Authors, Poets and Scientists,” will be presented and a book discussion “Necessary Assets” with author James Ring. FREE. 1 Partners Lane.


Sunday, January 12th

Greater New Bedford Track Club: Sunday Striders (8:00 am)
Sunday Striders, weekly training runs starting at 8 a.m. on Sundays. All levels of ability welcome; non-members are encouraged to join group. Marathon training continues. Phone: (508) 994-7209. Buttonwood Senior Center, 1 Oneida St. New Bedford.

Vivaldi right here in New Bedford!

Greater New Bedford Choral Society Winter Concert (12:00 pm-1:00 pm)
Grace Episcopal Church, County St. New Bedford. Tickets $15 at the door, Children 12 and under are free. For information vclick on event title.

“A Wicked Funny Time With Lenny Clarke” (Middleboro) (6:30 pm & 9:00 pm)
The Alley Theatre presents two shows of “A Wicked Funny Time With Lenny Clarke.” First show will open at 6:30 p.m. and start at 7 p.m. second show will open at 9 p.m. and show starts at 9:30 p.m. Tickets $35 per person and must be purchased in advance by calling (508) 946-1071 or by clicking on the event title. The Alley Theatre, 133 Center St.

Concerts at the Point (Westport) (12:00 pm-2:00 pm)
Presents Christina Day Martinson, Susanna Ogata, Guy Fishman and Ian Watson of the Handel & Haydn Society. Tickets $25 with $10 discount for students. Tickets at the door. Westport Point United Methodist Church, 1912 Main Road.

painting-spash-new-bedford

Painting With a Splash – Hot Cocoa with Zac (12 – 3 pm)
Ever want to take an art clash with a group of friends? Painting with a Spash’s first public class on 772 Purchase Street kicks off with Zac Meunier! It’s a BYOB class that costs $39 per student. Cost includes all the supplies! Details: http://paintingwithasplash.com/. Full class schedule: http://www.rezclick.com/paintingwithasplashnewbedfordma/index.php?page=classes#129.

Sunday Afternoon Jazz Live (4:00 pm-7:00 pm)
A fan of Jazz? Head to the Whaler Lounge today! Cost: $10 cover. Days Inn, 500 Hathaway Road.


Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. 





11 Things To Do This Weekend (Jan 03-Jan 05)

new-bedford-weather

Winter storm Hercules will obviously dominate the weather this weekend. The Weather Channel has a special page dedicated to the storm. It is probably safe to say that Friday “day” will be a wash. Of course, weatherfolk can only make predictions and aren’t 100% sure of the actual snowfall amounts. Some of the activities here may be postponed or cancelled depending on the actual amounts. Prudence would dictate that you call ahead if you plan to attend any of them.

While snowfall amounts are more difficult to predict, temperature and wind speeds are usually spot on. Friday could hit negative temperatures, but the weekend will progressively get warmer, reaching the 40s on Sunday.

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar  where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!


Friday, January 3rd

First Friday Open Mic (7:00 pm-9:00 pm)
First Unitarian Church of New Bedford presents First Friday Open Mic on the first Friday of each month. Free admission, refreshments available for purchase. 71 Eighth St.

Canine scent work for fun (Acushnet) (7:00-8:00pm)
Sign up early to save your spot in the next course! Register online or contact us for more details. Phone: 7749926929. Email: mjsdogtraining@gmail.com. Directions: Located in The Acushnet Plaza at MJ’s Pet Training Academy 132 S. Main Street Acushnet.


Saturday, January 4th

18th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon-Day 1 (10:00 am)
A fan of Melville’s Moby-Dick? Come celebrate at the 18th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon filled with readings, and other activities. Begins today at 10:00 am with a free public program, “Mast-headers and opera glasses: A conversation with librettist Gene Scheer about creating Moby-Dick the opera with Jake Heggie.” All day their will be chats with scholars, readings, conversations with artists, a performance by Culture*Park, etc. Click on event title for more info.

2 days of activities!

“We Still Live Here”; Tale of Wampanoag Revival (Westport) (5:00 pm-7:30 pm)
Dedee Shattuck Gallery presents a new program “The Art of Dialogue: Discussion and Films with Filmakers, Authors, Poets and Scientists” featuring Film Researcher and Assistant Producer, Jennifer Weston. “We Still Live Here” tells the remarkable story of the cultural revival of the Southeastern Massachusetts Indian tribe, the Wampanoag. FREE. 865 Main Rd, Westport.

Dances, Live Bands, prizes, raffles at the Holy Ghost Club (Westport) (7:00 pm-11:00 pm)
Live bands, door prizes, raffles. Cost: $6. Phone: (508) 636-3661. Holy Ghost Club, 171 Sodom Road, Westport.

Dancing: Sea Shell Steppers (Acushnet) (8:00-10:30 pm)
Mainstream/plus level square and round dancing on the first Saturdays of each month. For details or directions, call Ginny at (508) 991-4307 or Jim at (508) 947-9602. Acushnet Council on Aging, 59 1/2 S. Main St. Acushnet.


Sunday, January 5th

Greater New Bedford Track Club: Sunday Striders (8:00 am)
Sunday Striders, weekly training runs starting at 8 a.m. on Sundays. All levels of ability welcome; non-members are encouraged to join group. Marathon training continues. Phone: (508) 994-7209. Buttonwood Senior Center, 1 Oneida St. New Bedford.

18th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon-Day2 (10:00 am)
A fan of Melville’s Moby-Dick? Come celebrate at the 18th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon filled with readings, and other activities. The day starts with a chat with Melville scholars at 9:30, a chat with Melville artist Peter Michael Martin, then a finale and new exhibition opening “Martin and Moby.” Click on event title for more info.

The area’s finest wedding professionals!

Line and Partner Dancing (1:00 pm-5:00 pm)
DJ/Instructor Felicia Doble at the Wareham Elks Lodge. Bar & snack bar open-No outside drinks allowed. Beginner lesson at 1:30 p.m. For additional info click on event title or call Richard at (508) 245-767. 2855 Cranberry Hwy.

Hawthorne Country Club’s Annual Bridal Show (Dartmouth) (12:00 pm-2:00 pm)
Come to this spectacular wedding event featuring the area’s finest wedding professionals! The annual Bridal show at Hawthorne is free for brides and their guests. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and champagne will be served, and brides will have the chance to win excellent door prizes while enjoying the newly renovated Hawthorne Country Club. Call 508-997-3377 for more information. Email: info@hawthornecountryclub.com. Hawthorne Country Club 970 Tucker Rd. Dartmouth.

Sunday Afternoon Jazz Live (4:00 pm-7:00 pm)
A fan of Jazz? Head to the Whaler Lounge today! Cost: $10 cover. Days Inn, 500 Hathaway Road.


Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. 





Port of New Bedford Releases Study on East Coast Marine Highway Services

Expanded Marine Freight Network Would Relieve Landside Congestion, Lower Carbon Emissions and Improve Roadway Safety Among Other Benefits

The Port of New Bedford Harbor Development Commission, on behalf of the study’s Management Committee, released the East Coast Marine Highway Initiative M-95 Study, a comprehensive look into the development of a business case for marine highway services on the East Coast. The study was led by a partnership among the Port of New Bedford, Massachusetts; the Port of Baltimore, Maryland; Port Canaveral, Florida; New Jersey Department of Transportation and the I-95 Corridor Coalition. In order to promote an increase in marine highway services along the U.S. East Coast, the U.S. Maritime Administration provided financial assistance to determine market and operational feasibility for increased utilization of waterborne freight transportation along the M-95 Marine Highway Corridor.

The purpose of the combined East Coast Marine Highway Initiative was to study the potential for marine highway service(s) that could provide relief to congested Interstate-95. The study focused on those services identified in two Marine Highway Initiatives that were designated by the Secretary of Transportation in 2010. These were entitled: a) the AMH 1-95 Corridor Service Project (ports of New Bedford, Baltimore, and Canaveral) and b) New Jersey Marine Highway Platform as a Marine Highway Project.

While there have been many studies investigating general benefits provided by domestic coastal shipping services, the partnership decided to focus on specific costs, schedules and other requirements that would make a marine highway service viable. The study examined market forces and engaged the shipping industry to identify key impediments to the introduction of service(s) along the M-95 corridor.

Perhaps the most unique deliverable of the study was the operational development portion of the project. Vessel itineraries, service parameters, and potential terminal locations were developed for specific service routes. The study also referenced a previous U.S. Maritime Administration study to conceptualize vessel types that could be used for commercial service and provide resiliency to sealift capabilities during national emergencies. After identifying potential services, the study quantified the financial performance of those services with a business plan and viability analysis.

Acting Maritime Administrator Paul “Chip” Jaenichen described how this study will further the Maritime Administration’s efforts toward a comprehensive marine highway system. “Successful East Coast Marine Highway services, such as the 64 Express between Richmond and Norfolk, VA, provide public benefits by reducing traffic congestion, infrastructure maintenance costs, and transportation-related air emissions. This study helps to identify the institutional and operational challenges and opportunities for several potential East Coast services, helps stake holders to focus on business opportunities, and articulates where the tipping point for starting some of those services might lie. This is a helpful tool for anyone considering a new Marine Highway service along the Eastern Seaboard,” he said.

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell added “This study clearly articulates the benefits of America’s Marine Highway and provides us with a roadmap for making improvements so that we maximize its potential. The Port of New Bedford, as the Commonwealth’s largest industrial port outside of Boston, is aggressively pursuing new opportunities to attract shipping, so the release of this study is timely. The Port will continue to work with the U.S. Department of Transportation and U.S. Maritime Administration to advance policies that spur coastal shipping and provide meaningful economic, environmental and national security benefits,” he said.

The New Bedford Harbor Development Commission acknowledges the importance of the America’s Marine Highways Program to expand our local and regional economies, mitigate congestion, reduce environmental impacts, improve safety, and reduce energy consumption within Southern Massachusetts as well as the U.S. East Coast. Furthermore, the program offers an opportunity to provide a substantial stainable improvement in the overall capacity of the national freight transportation system.

In the coming months, the Port of New Bedford will continue to engage private industry regarding the development of a viable marine highway operation. The partnership will also use the findings to advocate for increased funding and policy changes that could spur this new industry.

The East Coast Marine Highway Initiative Study is available at: http://www.portofnewbedford.org/hdc/studies/.





Who Remembers…The Bijou Theater?

Here is another installment in our Who Remembers? series. You can browse previous articles by using the search bar on the right. These articles are strolls down memory lane. In some cases the buildings, but new businesses have replaced them. In other instances, the buildings or even the properties have been razed. Instead of a building, it may be a TV show, personality, or commercial that no one longer exists. Either way, it can’t stop us from taking the Memory Lane stroll!

As always we would rather this be a discussion. No one knows this area better than those who grew up here! Please, leave constructive criticism, feedback, and corrections. We’d love to hear your anecdotes. Please share!


350 Main Street; 1922: The American Building
I saw many a flick at the Bijou Theater on 350 Main Street, Fairhaven, during its almost decade and a half lifespan. I recall there being quite a buzz and the word-of-mouth was that you didn’t have to drive to Dartmouth – Cinema 140 and AMC at the Mall – and pay outrageous prices for movie tickets and concessions, but you could stay in Fairhaven and pay “retro-prices.” Tickets were $2.00 and all items from the concession stand were $1.50.

Madness.

Common local theater interior circa 1915 (Spinner Publications)

While most people today remember the venue as the Bijou Theater, the building’s history stretches back to 1922 when the building was erected and dubbed the “American” building.”

The following year on January 12, the American Theater opened taking on the building’s name. The proprietor then was one E.D. Davenport who would also run the Rialto Theater on Weld Street when it opened in 1927. The theater’s opening night selections were three silent movies “Fun From the Press,” “Golf,” and “the drama “Sonny.”

The timeline grows a bit dark at this point. It’s difficult to tell if the theater fell into disrepair or just wasn’t popular enough to keep doing what it was doing. The next blip on the historical radar is when Harold J. Shore renovates the venue and re-opens in May of 1934 as the “New American Theater.”

Second Fire, Catholic Legion of Decency list, and the Oxford Theater
It is short lived however, and ends up under new ownership and re-opens again on October 11, 1935 as the Keith Theater. Keith’s was a popular spot for years to come showcasing a double feature with a cartoon intermission for the price of admission: a whopping 25 cents. Popcorn and candy? Are you sitting? 5 cents. I think I feel lightheaded.

Get a load of these prices at a typical movie theater in the 1950s! (Spinner Publications)

On November 13, 1946 a 2-alarm fire caused by faulty wiring causes damage to not only Keith’s Theater, but many of the other tenants, which history lists as Keith’s Spa, the American Bowling Alleys, Martin’s Market, Pacheco’s Package Store, Melvin Press, and Pimental’s Pool Parlor. After repair, the theater opens as the “New Keith.”

In 1959, the Catholic Church had heavy influence in the area. Some of you dinosaurs may recall, the archaic Blue Laws, like the one that didn’t allow businesses to be open on Sunday.

Well, the church at this time had what was called Catholic Legion of Decency list. They knew what was best for you and banned those movies that they though would make little Johnny grow hairy palms. Curiously, some Disney Movies made the list, like “The Hound Who Thought He Was a Racoon.” “Porgy and Bess,” a 1959 musical based on a George Gershwin opera was another that made the list and was banned from being featured at the Bijou. People complained and the banned was lifted.

A second fire, suspected to be arson, occurs two decades later in 1965 forcing to the theater to close. We have a musical chairs theme…but with businesses! The theater would not return to showing films until 1972 when it re-opened as the Oxford Cinema under Weber Torres. In 1980 it was sold to Bijou Realty.

The Bijou Theater as we remember it!
The Bijou as most of us remember it, was opened after Dan Shea bought it in 1984. When Shea first opened he focused on independent and foreign films, as well as a few plays. Inside, there were hand-painted murals on a leatherette background featuring morning glories and stage walls had red velour – pretty posh!

Bijou Entrance

Shea got out of the theater business in 1990 when Evie Baum and an unknown partner took over.

They showcased, cherry-picked popular movies like Repo Man, Ghost, Silence of the Lambs, Wedding Singer, Under the Stairs, and even a few plays. A particular favorite of “townies” was the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

While the theater was an old-fashioned venue, the 20 speaker Dolby Digital Surround Sound System reminded you that it was certainly updated. They had genuine ambitions to make the Bijou a success story and a premier entertainment destination – which it was for almost 15 years.

Sadly, on May 9, 2004, the doors closed and stayed closed up to today. An inability for one screen to generate enough was cited as the reason for closing.

The last time I heard anything about the Bijou was when it was listed as “For Sale” in 2009: $375,000 would get you the theater, 3 store fronts abutting Main Street and the 15 studio apartments.

R.I.P. Bijou Theater (1984-2004)





10 Things To Do This Weekend (Dec 27-Dec 29)

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Though Winter has officially begun, this weekend won’t be winter-like at all! We will only dip into freezing temperatures for a short time on Friday and Sunday mornings, but for the rest of the weekend we will enjoy temperatures in the mid-40s. Flannel and jeans for us! Though, it appears we may see a bit of rain on Sunday with a 70% chance of precipitation. Considering we has a few snow days this Autumn, to have a rain day in the Winter is just fine.

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar  where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!


Friday, December 27th

Christmas Festival of Lights (Carver) (4:00 pm-9:00 pm)
Runs from today through January 1st. Edaville’s Christmas Festival of Lights is arguably the most-loved festival of its kind, having earned generations of loyal fans. Passengers relax comfortably in warm and dry coaches while riding through a spectacular holiday setting featuring an explosion of lights. Kids of all ages will enjoy an array of vintage amusement rides and a visit with Santa in one of our indoor play areas. Stay for a delicious full meal or enjoy seasonal treats.

Community Drum Circle (Fairhaven) (7:00-8:00pm)
Rhythm celebration – not a performance on the fourth Friday of each month. Newcomers welcome! From wikipedia: “Community drum circles are informal gatherings of people who meet for the purpose of playing drums together. Instrumentation centers around drums and percussion, but may include other instruments, such as flutes, didgeridoos, and other non-percussion instruments. Practically anything that can be banged on to make noise can be used as a percussion instrument such as cans, buckets, pipes, etc. One need not possess or purchase a drum to participate. ” Cost: $4. Phone: (508) 636-3871. Email: trdrelm@rcn.com. Unitarian Memorial Church 102 Green St.


Saturday, December 28th

Used Book Sale (Wareham) (9:30 am-1:30 pm)
Monthly sale of used books and music CDs. Used hardcovers and paperbacks and some books-on-tape for sale every day in the lobby of the library. Proceeds to benefit the Friends of the Wareham Library. 59 Marion Road, Wareham, MA.

(Edaville..com)

Family Bay Discovery Days: Gifts from the Bay (Marion) (10:00 am-11:00 am)
Outdoors Scavenger hunt at Planting Island Causeway. Free. Registration required email bayadventures@savebuzzardsbay.org or call (508) 999-6262, ext. 219. Planting Island Road.

Awakening with Selenite and Sound (Westport) (2:00-4:30 pm)
Raise your vibration and release that which no longer serves you with Nicki and her Selenite Slabs, Crystal Singing Bowls and Guided Meditations. Please call 774.201.0012 or sign up on Facebook at Soothing Sensations Reiki. Soothing Sensations Wellness Center on 1180 State Road Westport, Mass.

Christmas Festival of Lights (Carver) (4:00 pm-9:00 pm)
Runs from today through January 1st. Edaville’s Christmas Festival of Lights is arguably the most-loved festival of its kind, having earned generations of loyal fans. Passengers relax comfortably in warm and dry coaches while riding through a spectacular holiday setting featuring an explosion of lights. Kids of all ages will enjoy an array of vintage amusement rides and a visit with Santa in one of our indoor play areas. Stay for a delicious full meal or enjoy seasonal treats.


Sunday, December 29th

Breakfast & Trap Shooting (Mattapoisett) (12:00 pm-3:00 pm)
Weather permitting. Breakfast available for members and their guests from 7-11 a.m. Cost: $4 per round ($3 per round for members). Fin, Fur & Feather Club, 35 Crystal Spring Road, Matt.

Country Bone.com

Line and Partner Dancing (1:00 pm-5:00 pm)
DJ/Instructor Felicia Doble at the Wareham Elks Lodge. Bar & snack bar open-No outside drinks allowed. Beginner lesson at 1:30 p.m. For additional info click on event title or call Richard at (508) 245-767. 2855 Cranberry Hwy.

Christmas Festival of Lights (Carver) (4:00 pm-9:00 pm)
Runs from today through January 1st. Edaville’s Christmas Festival of Lights is arguably the most-loved festival of its kind, having earned generations of loyal fans. Passengers relax comfortably in warm and dry coaches while riding through a spectacular holiday setting featuring an explosion of lights. Kids of all ages will enjoy an array of vintage amusement rides and a visit with Santa in one of our indoor play areas. Stay for a delicious full meal or enjoy seasonal treats.

Sunday Afternoon Jazz Live (4:00 pm-7:00 pm) Day 1
A fan of Jazz? Head to the Whaler Lounge today! Cost: $10 cover. Days Inn, 500 Hathaway Road.

Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. 





Who Remembers…Star Store?

Here is another installment in our Who Remembers? series. You can browse previous articles by using the search bar on the right. These articles are strolls down memory lane. In some cases the buildings, but new businesses have replaced them. In other instances, the buildings or even the properties have been razed. Instead of a building, it may be a TV show, personality, or commercial that no one longer exists. Either way, it can’t stop us from taking the Memory Lane stroll!

As always we would rather this be a discussion. No one knows this area better than those who grew up here! Please, leave constructive criticism, feedback, and corrections. We’d love to hear your anecdotes. Please share!

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Fourth Street; Thomas Knowles & Company
Once upon a time, before Purchase Street was named so, it was called 4th Street. It was primarily residential, had a rather large park with gardens and was lined with elm trees. As more and more revenue from Whaling entered the city, business “sprawl” spread north. The first three streets were primarily service streets – businesses that served whaling, i.e. coopers, carpenters, wrights, smithies, customs, the Seamen’s Bethel, Mariner’s home, brothels, etc. The first available street for residents to go shopping or be entertained at was Fourth Street and Purchase Street – East of Union Street- was born circa 1834.

One of the very first dry goods stores on Purchase Street to open was artist William Bradford’s at 16 Purchase Street in 1845. Another merchant, who saw the great potential of Purchase Street was one Thomas Knowles (1803-1877). He and his brother, John Pepper formed a partnership in 1835, T.& J.P. Knowles producing clothing.

New Bedford Dry Goods’ Star Store circa 1916 (Spinner Publications)

Their cousin Joseph Knowles entered the picture and they opened a store on the Northwest Corner of Union and Purchase Street called Thomas Knowles & Company in 1844 – likely the very first establishment to sell dry goods on the street. In addition to dry goods, they sold groceries, provisions and were also agents for over a dozen whaling vessels.

The buildings of note by the 1860s were Liberty Hall, the granite North Congregational Church, the Cummings Building and the Wing’s Building – which was the precursor to Wing’s Department Store and Wing’s Court. More and more businesses popped up on Purchase Street and it became the premier shopping destination.

New Bedford Dry Goods Company
Back to Thomas Knowles & Company – they operated their store with their sons until 1894. Here there is a lacuna in the timeline of the building’s history. When it appears next, it’s New Bedford Dry Goods headed by president Asa A. Mills, which opened to wholesalers on October 8, 1898 with a sales force of 20 people. This store claims to be the site of the very first escalator in the country – in spite of the fact that the Guinness Book of World Records lists Coney Island as having the first.

The one-story building and its basement consisted of a modest 15,000 sq. ft., but its popularity by 1915 meant a ten-fold expansion: they increased their workforce to 300 and took over adjacent buildings to the tune of 150,000 sq. ft. By 1918 it opened to the public, needed an elevator because it expanded upward, and even added a roof garden. New Bedford Dry Goods aka the Star Store became the shopping destination.

Slew of Factoids – Credit plates, carillons, pneumatic tubes
Coincidentally, a lady named Mary Dorothy Cox was selling candies out of the New Bedford Dry Goods Store in 1925.

Union Street from Acushnet Avenue. Left to right: Dewolf – 2nd Geo. Lobdell Hall second floor, Sheedy’s Vaudville – F.W. Francis, Pool Room – Caleb Maxfield furniture, store – Knowles Dry Goods (upstairs), Pierian Hall (Whaling Museum)

It had a deli, clothing department, jewelry, cosmetics, pet center, and more. In 1952, Star Store jumped on the bandwagon of “merchant cards”, the precursor to credit cards with a metal card called a “credit plate.” Sometime in the 1960s they built a carillon, which was an automatic music “machine” that consisted of bells that were struck electronically. Star Store’s carillon was a favorite around Christmas time when it belted out Carols and popular Christmas tunes.

A “first” claim for Star Store was that it was the first store in the country to utilize pneumatic tubes which used small containers to send bills and receipts. While it was surely used for practical reasons, it had a real promotional value in drawing in local children.

Musical businesses
Star Store was purchased in 1969 by Boston department store Gorin’s, who intended to keep it as it was. In 1976, a 300-year-old, archaic Blue Law stated that business had to be closed on Sunday. Star Store bucked the law as did Kresge’s further downtown Purchase Street and Golub’s Furniture.

In 1983, Almy bought the Star Store from Gorin’s and opened another Star Store in Fairhaven in the old King’s Department Store where Shaw’s Supermarket is/was now in Berdon Plaza. King’s Department store had a run as a Zaire’s and Ames as well.

Almy’s was purchased by Stop & Shop in 1985 who held a liquidation sale (at the New Bedford site) before closing the doors permanently on January 12, 1985. In November, it re-opened as Stuart’s employing 175 people. Continuing the theme of musical businesses Stuart’s closed its doors in 1987, and moved to the North End. The building was officially vacant and began to deteriorate to the point that the facade was falling onto the sidewalks and street and the city had to erect a covered walkway. Thieves began to strip the building of its copper flashing.

Deli Department 1975 (Spinner Publications)

The building was supposed to be the Bristol Hotel, but never materialized. 1989 Hotel Properties paid a little more than $2 million for the building and planned on spending $8 million to turn it into a 117 room hotel. Didn’t happen. In 1990 it was to be turned into a Sheraton hotel that included 14,000 sq ft of retail space…didn’t happen. In 1992 Building was foreclosed on by New England Federal Savings Bank as the owners filed for bankruptcy.

In 1995 the city took over as $700,000 was owed in back taxes and handed control over to the New Bedford Redevelopment Authority. With the influence of Senator Mark Montigny, Governor Paul Cellucci granted the city $32 million in 1998 to renovate a three block area with $16.6 million dollars set aside for the Star Store building. A deal was struck between the city and Sakonnet Properties Inc. who would give the city the Coffin Building which was actually two buildings adjacent to the Star Store. The city in turn forgave $376,000 in back taxes and footed the $500,000 bill to repair the facade.

The rest as they say – is history.


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Who Remembers…Barbero’s Pizza?

Here is another installment in our Who Remembers? series. You can browse previous articles by using the search bar on the right. These articles are strolls down memory lane. In some cases, the buildings, but new businesses have replaced them. In other instances, the buildings or even the properties have been razed. Instead of a building, it may be a TV show, personality, or commercial that no one longer exists. Either way, it can’t stop us from taking the Memory Lane stroll!

As always we would rather this be a discussion. No one knows this area better than those who grew up here! Please, leave constructive criticism, feedback, and corrections. We’d love to hear your anecdotes. Please share!

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Memories of 85 Huttleston Avenue
Having grown up a gypsy, I’ve lived in New Bedford (no less than 7 different locations), Fairhaven (4 different addresses), Rochester, and Acushnet. That only covers Massachusetts and not the other states and countries I’ve lived in. The benefit of living in multiple locations is I can wax nostalgic over a variety of places. When I first moved to Fairhaven, I was perhaps 14 years old if memory serves me correctly. What is top of the food pyramid for a 14-year-old? Yeah, you guessed it: pizza.

Bob and Ray Barbero at Margaret’s Variety Store (Nina Barbero)

So it was only natural to seek out who had the best pizza around. Having moved to Fairhaven from New Bedford, that meant going over the bridge and down Route 6. Destiny dictated that as I was staring out the window I saw a sign – I swear there was a golden aura shimmering around the sign – stating Barbero’s Italian Restaurant at 85 Huttleston Avenue.

I kid you not when I say that I am now salivating. I feel like I should race into the kitchen, dig through all the drawers and see if I have enough coupons for a FREE pizza. I bet you somewhere in my attic of packed away things, there’s a Barbero’s coupon. Remember those green cut-outs on each pizza box? 10 coupons gets you a golden ticket.

This was THE spot for Italian food in Fairhaven for the longest time, especially pizza. I vaguely remember the variety of toppings, but remembering there being a lot to choose from. Barbero’s always loaded their pies with generous amounts of toppings. I didn’t like thin pizza anywhere else and don’t like it today. I have NOT ordered and eaten a plain cheese pizza since.

This was my brother Mike’s favorite place to eat whenever he would get a break from military duty. He would fly in from wherever he was living in the world at that time, and within a few hours, the words “Let’s go to Barbero’s!” would be on his lips.

The original restaurant after its conversion in 1951 (Nina Barbero)

I have a vague recollection of the mini-golf course next door and reader Janet Gouveia Rusinsoki who worked there for 3 decades, stated that Barbero’s also owned the golf course, which was placed there in the 1960s. Batting cages were also added in the early 1990s, but were eventually razed to make way for a parking lot.

Barbero’s was such a landmark, that if you needed to give anyone directions, you could say “Go past Barbero’s and take that left.” or “Turn right at the lights after Barbero’s.” Barbero’s was brilliantly located near my house – which led to teenage entrapment while walking home.

Sadly, the Fairhaven Barbero’s closed their doors on March 15, 1998.

Margaret’s Variety; Corner of County and Linden Streets
Our more knowledgeable readers will know that the Fairhaven location wasn’t the only location. There were seven or eight “Barbero’s” depending on how one counts, from New Bedford, Fairhaven and Dartmouth, to Dennisport, Falmouth, Marion – even a sub shop on Union Street (the early 1970s), and a concession stand at Lincoln Park for 8 years at one point.

Barbero’s had humble beginnings with three variety stores throughout New Bedford. The third variety store, “Margaret’s Variety” was named after Joseph Barbero Sr.’s wife Margaret. This variety store opened in 1951 and was on the corner of County and 58 Linden Street, which is Linden House of Pizza & More now.

The Barbero Family – Ray, Joe, Margaret, Joey, & Bob (Nina Barbero)

When I lived on 868 County Street next door to Kinyon Campbell, I went to this spot often, and as long as I can recall it was always a sub and pizza shop, changing names over the years. Margaret’s Variety sold fresh baked bread from Tom Marcucci’s Bakery of Fall River. It was Tom that suggested they sell pizza – which they did for 5 whopping cents a slice. The pizza was so popular and demand so great that Tom suggested they begin to make it themselves. The rest is history!

Margaret’s Variety was converted into a small restaurant and began to sell that famous mouth-watering pizza, soft-serve ice cream, and soda from a fountain. Eventually, Joe and Margaret’s sons Joe, Ray, and Bob ran the business until the early 1960s. This establishment in turn also became so popular that they expanded and opened a second Barbero’s in 1958, which was the one in Fairhaven that I began the article with. The third Barbero’s was opened, coincidentally at the old A&W’s in Dartmouth at 868 State Road.

I need a Barbero’s pizza in my life…STAT!

If you want to peruse a ton of great old photos of Barbero’s there is a “Remembering Barbero’s” Facebook! I want to extend a heartfelt thanks to Nina Barbero for most of the information and all the photos in this article. Without her generosity, this article would have been another boring write-up with a photo of a Barbero’s coupon.

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