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17 Things To Do This Weekend (June 26-June 28)

We will have weekend weather that is perfectly conducive to heading out and enjoying the many activities and events taking place in the South Coast and beyond. While we’ll be near 80 degrees all week, we’ll have some cool evenings and mornings, getting as low as 47 degrees on Friday and the low to mid 50s for Saturday and Sunday.

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!

new-bedford-weather


Friday, June 26th

Zoo Nights at Buttonwood (5:30- 8:00pm)
Zoo Nights are designed to offer families an opportunity to enjoy the Zoo on cool summer nights, experience animal encounters and participate in children’s activities.

6th Annual Kick-off to Summer Celebration (Fall River) (6:00-11:00pm)
Evening celebrations overlooking Fall River’s waterfront, cash bar, gourmet dinners, live auctions and music provided by the World Premier Band. Tickets are $100 per person and benefit Saint Vincent’s. Reserve tickets by calling Melissa Dick (508) 235-3228.Downtown Fall River.

Community Drum Circle (Fairhaven) (7:00pm)
Rhythm celebration, not a performance. Newcomers welcome. Doors open at 7 p.m. Cost: $4. Phone: (508) 636-3871. Email: trdrelm@rcn.com. Unitarian Memorial Church 102 Green St.

Yay! Zoo Nights!

Painting with a Splash: Canoe on the Shore & Van Gogh Starry Night (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.

Movies in the Park: “Frozen.” (8:30pm)
Presented by the Mattapoisett Lions Club. Next screening, “Frozen.” 8:30 p.m. June 27. All are welcome. Shipyard Park.


Saturday, June 27th

21st Annual Buzzards Bay Swim (5:30am)
Celebrate a clean, healthy Buzzards Bay at the Buzzards Bay Swim! Join more than 300 others who make a difference to protect and restore our irreplaceable Bay. You can swim, volunteer, or cheer on swimmers as they cross outer New Bedford Harbor.

Fairhaven Homecoming Fair (10:00am & 4:00pm)
Fairhaven’s largest annual event features about 175 booths of handmade crafts and delicious foods in addition to live entertainment, an art exhibit on the west lawn of the Unitarian Church, and children’s activities, including the very popular fire engine rides. Sponsored by the Fairhaven Improvement Association. Free. Handicap parking available.

Whalers Cove Bazaar and Bake Sale (10:00am-6:30pm)
New items, raffles, baked sale at 114 Riverside Ave.

Paint “Canoe on the Shore” at Painting w/ A Splash!

Charles W. Morgan Homecoming Activities (9:00am)
9:00am: Mystic Seaport Dockside Exhibition, Traveling Dockside Exhibitions, Community Exhibitions and Educational Programs. 10:00AM: Official Homecoming Ceremony with author Nathaniel Philbrick then the Morgan will be open for visitors.

Westport River Day (9:30am-3:30pm)
All paddlers receive a free t-shirt, water bottle and lunch at the Head of Westport Landing. Pre-register for $20 members, $30 non-members or register day of for $30 members, $40 non-members. Paddlers assemble at Hix Bridge Landing before 9:30 a.m. with activities continuing at the Head of Westport Landing throughout the day. Taking place at the East Branch of Westport River, Hix Bridge Landing.

Down By the Bay – Mattapoisett Woman’s Club Garden Tour (10:00-4:00pm)
Nine gardens will be featured including a lily farm, Bay Club, seaside, and village locations. A delicious buffet luncheon will be served at the Bay Club, an Audubon Sanctuary, on the terrace overlooking the beautiful #1 fairway.

Painting with a Splash: N.B. Lightship & Wine At Its Best (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.


Sunday, June 28th

N.B. Police Union presents the Zerbini Family Circus (3:00pm & 6:00pm)
Head to Fort Taber Park on Sunday and Monday as the New Bedford police union presents the Zerbini family circus! Clowns, aerialists, trampoline, comedy balancing acts, and more! Rain or shine!

A real old-fashioned circus on Sunday and Monday!

Charles W. Morgan Homecoming Activities (9:00am-1:00pm)
10:00am: Ecumenical Service at Seamen’s Bethel. 12:30pm: Boat Parade in New Bedford Harbor.

Strides for Success 5K at New Bedford YMCA (9:00am-3:00pm)
For ages 11 and up. Kids races at 9 a.m. Cash prizes for first, second and third place. First 200 registrants get a t-shirt. To register visit www.racewire.com. 25 South Water St.

Whalers Cove Bazaar and Bake Sale (10:00am-3:00pm)
New items, raffles, baked sale at 114 Riverside Ave.

Painting with a Splash: Beach House (2:00pm)
Join Painting w/ A Splash for the “Paint For Paws” event to support forever Paws Animal Shelter. Reserve your seat for $45 and all proceeds benefit Forever Paws! Tickets include pizza, munchies and surprises. There will also be a raffle to support the cause!

Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details.





Pet ownership – a far greater responsibility than many realize!

Being a responsible owner starts even before you decide to bring a pet into your home.

I love animals. I don’t know if we’re raised to be an animal lover or if it’s something developed in our own personality. Being someone with such high regard for her pets, the law frustrates me when it comes to protecting them. They are considered property – much like a piece of furniture. Even though animal cruelty laws have come leaps and bounds the legal understanding of a pet still leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to the punishment of those who abuse our furry family members. With that in mind….

It is our obligation to them that we be responsible pet owners.

Being a responsible owner starts even before you decide to bring a pet into your home. You have to possess the understanding that this is a long term commitment. It will affect your finances, living situation and your time for the next 10+yrs! Especially if you desire a puppy or a kitten who has their whole life in front of them. That life becomes your responsibility.

Should you decide on a dog, you have to understand the needs of the breed you want. Either mixed or full bred, different breeds can have very opposite needs from medical to what ideal household suites them. For instance, some dogs need daily vigorous exercise and without it will become destruction or in worse cases aggressive.

Some dogs who are bred for their popular pint size appeal…
If you are unable to walk a dog daily or don’t have a large enclosed yard where you can play daily with your dog in, you may want to avoid these types of dogs. For their own good and for yours. Remember dogs live on average about 13 years.

Some dogs who are bred for the popular pint size appeal have suffered genetic or hereditary medical issues. This can become a costly issue to the dog owner which can seem to be shocking that what was once an adorable little puppy has some very big issues down the line. Not that larger dogs miss this bullet as well. One of the big things to take into account before bringing a pet home is the unforeseen expense of them being sick or simply growing old. Common conditions such as arthritis and hip dysplasia, congestive heart failure, diabetes. When your pet needs you the most, will you be there for it?

Shifting focus to the most popular pet: the cat – the adorable creature who doesn’t require you to bring them for walks or possibly never have to groomed (dare you to give a cat a bath). Then can seem like an ideal choice to someone who works often or doesn’t have a yard. But is it the right choice for you?

A cat can live on average about 14 years (take that dog) and for the span of their life you need to provide food and clean water daily. Every other day you need to clean their litter box and should you like many other American households choose to have multiple cats than you need at least one litter box per cat. They need their nails trimmed monthly and require scratching post or else will find a piece of your furniture to take out their natural urge to claw at on. Some cats can take on behavior issues and require being played with to curve their needs to act out. Just like dogs, cats can have medical issues that can arise out of nowhere. Costly issues. Keep in mind that the odds are against you having Pet Medical Insurance but the cost of their medications and doctor visits are no different than with ours.

Of course there are other pets out there…some with feathers others with scales and of course the ones with more than four legs (shivers). To keep things simpler I focuses on the leading two pets owned by people in this country and in this area.

One happy family!

After you’ve done your research on the pet you desire and have a full understanding of what needs can be met in your household.. Taking into account how stable your household is (are you a renter? do you have a job that requires you to move? do you plan on having children?).

Now it’s time for you to pick-up your pet. Will it be adoption?

Animals shelters care for an estimated 6-8 million dogs and cats each year! Of which 3-4 million are euthanized. Simply no room for them, no funds to care for them and no homes to place them in. If you choose to adopt an animal, you ARE saving a life. Whether it be a kitten or puppy or a senior dog or cat. By taking them into your home you are opening a slot in which another homeless animal can fill.

To divert a bit off subject, adopting a senior animal is a wonderful thing. Not only are the adoption fees considerably less but you have a grateful pet who’s full personality has already been revealed which means no surprises or sudden bad behavior. Also a great idea if you can only look ahead a few years and then maybe after that plan on having children or moving. A short term commitment that can be very rewarding.

Back to finding an animal. The other option is of course purchasing an animal. The benefit of going to a breeder is knowing the bloodline of your pet and if it’s a reputable breeder than the odds will be in your favor that there are no hereditary issues. I implore you that if you decide to purchase a dog or cat that you do your homework on the breeder. Being a good breeder comes at a high expense to them for a little profit. A backyard breeder doesn’t invest well enough into their animals or their offspring and you the consumer will suffer the fallout of that. Taking home a pet that could very well have a much shorter life ahead of it with countless medical issues. Being cute never means being healthy.

A cat can live on average about 14 years.
No matter how you decide to obtain your pet I hope you do the responsible thing as their human parent and have them spay or neutered. Like I said earlier, almost 8 million dogs and cats end up in shelters and overpopulation can be controlled by us. They are animals. The basic instinct to breed is there and it’s our obligation to this world to be responsible pet owners. If you’ve taken in a stray contact your local Animal Control about low cost programs to have it fixed. If you’ve decided that you want to breed your pet for profit. Have the knowledge to know that profiting from backyard breeding mostly doesn’t exist. After cost, you most likely will be taking a loss. We can’t end abuse on animals (I wish I could say or think otherwise) but we can stop helping the overpopulation of them which in many cases leads to horrific mistreatment of them. This starts with each of us at home.

Being a pet owner is being a parent. If you understand that, than you are already doing something right.

“Until one has owned an animal, a part of one’s soul remains un-awakened” – Anatole France





20 Things To Do This Weekend (June 19-June 21)

Yay! No rain for a change! Nature has removed all the excuses you could possibly come up with not to head out and enjoy the many fun events taking place on the South Coast and beyond. We’ll be close to 80 degrees all weekend long and the sun will be shining! If you don’t head out and enjoy it while you can, you’ll be in for a shock when we start mentioning the “S” word!

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!

new-bedford-weather


Friday, June 19th

Sunset Music Series: Gary Faris (Westport) (5:00-7:00pm)
Gary Faris
Westport Rivers Winery: Sunset Music Series every Friday 5-7 p.m. through September. Next concert, Gary Faris. Admission $10 per carload and beer, wine and SoCo local food will be served for a fee. Weather permitting. 417 Hixbride Road.

“Benjamin Russell” opening reception and book release (6:00-8:00pm)
New Bedford Whaling Museum presents an opening reception and book release for Keith W. Kauppila’s new book “Benjamin Russell: Whaleman-Artist, Entrepreneur.” An exhibition of the same name will run through July. (508) 997-0046.

FREE Children’s Festival!

Paint Party For Habitat For Cats (Westport) (6:00pm)
At Joe’s Cafe & Lounge. Evening of painting and laughs, $35 per person. For more information or for tickets visit www.upaintevents.com. 549 American Legion Hwy.

Painting with a Splash: Lighthouse w/ Fitz (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.

New Bedford Symphony Orchestra FREE Concert (7:00pm)
NBSO presents a celebratory concert for the merging of South Coast Chamber Music Society and New Bedford Symphony Orchestra. Free. Grace Episcopal Church, 133 School St.


Saturday, June 20th

Operation Clean Sweep: Volunteer to beautify New Bedford! (8:30am-12:00pm)
The Operation Clean Sweep Anti-Litter campaign is working to improve the quality of life in New Bedford through organized cleanup, education, and advocacy for enforcement of city ordinances. Ward 6: Ruth Street between McGurk Street and Salisbury Street. Pre-register at 508.979.1493. Sign-up or check in at the OCS headquarters. e-mail: info @operationcleansweep.net.

Love hot rods? Check this out!

10th Annual Car Show: Refreshments, door prizes, entertainment, raffle! (10:00am-1:00pm)
Rain or shine! Registration from 9-10am. SVT Cobra, Mustang & All Fords. Register to win door prizes, FREE refreshments, FREE entertainment by “Johnny Angel,” and a 50/50 raffle! 3 awards per class, 14 classes in all. Free dash plaques for the first 50 people. For more information or to register, call 617.827.9789 or visit ashleyfordsales.com. 395 Mt. Pleasant Street.

Charles W. Morgan and His Contemporaries cemetery tour (10:00-1:00pm)
Enjoy historic portrayals in period costume at gravesides of the Morgans and other first families of New Bedford. Oak Grove Cemetery Parker Street New Bedford, Mass. For more info visit http://www.nbpreservationsociety.org/eventscalendar.html, Phone: 508-997-6425. Email: nbps2000@yahoo.com.

Summer Open House FREE Family Event! (10:00am-2:00pm)
Head to the Andrea McCoy Recreation Center at 181 Hillman Street for outdoor games, class demonstrations, face painting, piano workshop display, phot booth, giveaways, outdoor obstacle course, bubble pool, horseshoes, arts & crafts, and more! Call 608.991.6209 for more information.

Learning to quahog! (10:00-11:30am)
Buzzards Bay Coalition “Learning to quahog” program. Free. Registration required, email bayadventures@savebuzzardsbay.org or call (508) 999-6262, ext. 219. Meet by the restrooms at Fort Taber.

3rd Annual Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Market (Westport) (11:30am, 2:30pm, 6:00pm)
At Westport Fairgrounds. Event to feature tastings from all ten of Coastal Wine Trail’s Vineyards as well as fresh, local food items. Three sessions: 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 2:30-5 p.m. and 6-8:30 p.m. Tickets $25 advance, $40 at the door. For information and tickets visit www.coastalwinetrail.com/wine-cheese-chocolate-festival. 200 Pine Hill Road.

Fishing For A Cause (Fairhaven) (1:00pm)
Fishing For A Cause to help local children with special needs and Schwartz Center for Children. Catch-and-release Striped Bass, Blue Fish and Fluke tournament spanning Cape Cod to Block Island and beyond. Tournament culminated in catered seaside dinner at Pope’s Island Marina. For information call (508) 996-3391 or visit www.fishing4acause.org. Pope’s Island Marina.

FREE Children’s Summer Festival (1:00-5:00pm)
The House of Music on 593 Kempton Street features a Michael Jackson show. facepainting, games, prizes, pony rides, moon bounce, dunk tank, bubbles, art & crafts, hula hoops and more. All for FREE!!

seaside-street-party

SeaSide Street Party (4-8 pm) 

Lower Union Street in downtown New Bedford will be closed down to vehicle traffic for a street party for charity. $10 per ticket and all proceeds benefit the New Bedford Education Association. Live music: 4-6pm Neal McCarthy Experiment, 6-8pm Heart and Soul.

Silverbrook Farm ACUSHNET!

Silverbrook Farm ACUSHNET: FREE Tractor Rides/Movie Night “Wizard of Oz”! (7:00pm)
Silverbrook Farm ACUSHNET doesn’t only provide the freshest, organic produce around for CSAs, a country store that has fresh baked breads, pies, jams, ice cream, pastries, and more….but they also have family oriented events all season long, including the very popular movie night that kicks of with FREE tractor rides. Take the family and see what all the buzz is about at one of the South Coast’s premier fun destinations!

Painting with a Splash: Sailboat Sunset w/ Ann (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.


Sunday, June 21st

Lique of Franco Americans (8:30am & 1:00pm)
96th celebration of the Feast of Saint John the Baptist. Flag raising at Franco-American Veterans Square. Banquet at the Wamsutta Club, 1 p.m. Award ceremony and scholarship ceremony will be held. Tickets $25, for tickets call Nomand Ouellette at (508) 674-7036.

6th Annual Walk, Talk & Rock (Plymouth) (10:00am)
The Sixth Annual Walk, Talk & Rock to Cure scleroderma will kick off at Nelson Beach in Plymouth. Registration begins at 10 a.m. with the 4K Walk stepping off at noon. From the park, the walk will go through Plymouth center, then along the waterfront. Walk to find a cure for scleroderma; Talk among friends and family to increase awareness; and Rock to music. Face painting, clowns and refreshments. Registration, information: E-mail: rdube@sfnewengland.org or call 978-887-0658.

Help clean up New Bedford with a great group of people!

51st Annual St. Rose of Lima Chicken Barbecue (Rochester) (12:00pm)
St. Rose of Lima Church. Bake shop, raffles, silent auction, kids games, face painting, rock wall and more. Music provided by KP Productions. Adults $9, children $5. 282 Vaughan Hill Road.

SeaSide Street Party (2- pm) 

Lower Union Street in downtown New Bedford will be closed down to vehicle traffic for a street party for charity. $10 per ticket and all proceeds benefit the New Bedford Education Association. Live music: 2-4 Jack,  Trade and the Gaad Damn Band.

Painting with a Splash: “Paint For Paws” to support Forever Paws Animal Shelter (5:00pm)
Join Painting w/ A Splash for the “Paint For Paws” event to support forever Paws Animal Shelter. Reserve your seat for $45 and all proceeds benefit Forever Paws! Tickets include pizza, munchies and surprises. There will also be a raffle to support the cause!

Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details.





OPINION: Female Dartmouth High School students question “airport security terminals” style inspections

By Kortney Gadbois

Dress codes have long been an issue in school especially those without uniforms, however Dartmouth High School’s approach to solving this issue is spreading into the territory of sexism and infringing on the rights and privacy of the female students.

The approach of the administration also directly disregards the Student Handbook Policies that they put forth. Female students are now being asked to dress “business professional” and to cover their collar bones so as not to be a “distraction” in the learning environment. Below is the Dress Code for DHS as printed in the Student Handbook:

The outlined Dress Code does not include the issues of collarbones being covered or business professional wear, and it also does not state that students should be pulled out of class learning time or subject to inspection prior to classes starting in the morning via “airport security terminals” as the students have named this process.

Dress codes are necessary, there is no doubt about that, however they need to be equal for all,. It is the job of faculty to ensure that students are following the dress code in a manner that is not disruptive to learning time or sexist in their targets. There have been several cases of female students being “inspected” by administrators while male faculty observed, albeit from a distance – it is still inappropriate.

On Tuesday, June 3 the inspections of students were taken a step further when all female students were pulled out of class during learning time, to be inspected for inappropriate wear. One student, who wishes to remain anonymous, questioned the administration as she was pulled out of her English class during learning time to have her outfit inspected along with her other fellow female classmates. She asked, “Who are we distracting…the boys?” The administrator replied, “No, we don’t want to single out the boys as the only ones being distracted.” Upset and confused the student replied “But you are singling out the girls.”

This inappropriate removal from class during learning time to inspect the female students clothing is taking the issue of dress code a step too far as if the “airport security terminals” were not enough to shake up the students. John Nunes, the Dartmouth School Committee Chair, had no knowledge of these happenings on Tuesday at Dartmouth High nor was he aware of the “airport security terminals” system that DHS adopted. He did state that he hopes all students are being treated equally and fairly by administration regarding any issue within the school.

Newly elected School Committee member, Chris Garth, provided some great insight to the issue of the dress code within DHS although he was not completely aware of all the attempts to inspect the outfits of the female students’ clothing. Garth stated that he believes there should certainly be consequences when the dress code is violated, however the procedure of inspecting the outfits of the students need to match the policies in place and not tread on the line of the students privacy and self-esteem. He offered the suggestion of a student written dress code that brings them closer to the issue and allows them to make decisions and will hopefully ensure they better follow the outlined policy.

This will not only allow the students to gain independence within the school community, but they will feel a boost in self-esteem and enjoy the ability to team up with administration on an issue that is so prevalent in their lives. Garth’s ideas are on the right track!

We, as the community of Dartmouth, need to rally around our students and help them gain positive body images and the understanding of where and when certain clothes are appropriate without badgering or humiliating them. Whether it be in front of a full cafeteria or the privacy of an office the insensitive ways of the administration are not helpful nor wanted and should change immediately.

This is a global issue that we can conquer within our community. We need to boost the students esteem and teach them that certain clothing is appropriate at some times and not at others.

As well as reminding them that regardless of the clothing a student is wearing, they are still equal to everyone else and deserve the same respect as others. We need to stop shaming girls for wearing certain clothing and teach the boys that girls are not sexual objects to be gawked at while passing in the halls. There should be no name calling among students because of the clothing they are wearing but a sense of camaraderie among the students and faculty of the school.

With new administration for Dartmouth on the horizon, we need to gather as a community and make choices that will promote community within the school and equality for all. As a graduate of Dartmouth High School, it saddens me to hear of this issue and makes me wonder where the community I once knew and grew up in vanished to. I hope that we can make a positive change for the future of the students in the Dartmouth Public Schools system so they can enjoy their years in school as I once did and experience a sense of community among each other and the administration of the schools.

Let us band together Dartmouth, to make the right choice for our students, to end this insensitive and unnecessary inspection of the students clothing, and focus on the positive within our schools including academic and extracurricular achievement.





The curious cases of mailing children in 1913-1914

Did the United States Postal Service really mail kids? (Smithsonian Institute)

While researching history for some of the articles here at New Bedford Guide, I browse through a substantially large number of photographs. While a fair amount of them are uninteresting or dull, it’s not uncommon to come across some rather curious ones. In some cases, it takes an entire photo album to tell a story – in other cases, one photograph tells a number of stories!

Such is the case when I came across the above photo of what appears to be two postal workers delivering an infant and and a baby. This is one that I just had to share. Before we get too far and draw too much attention from those who like to leap out of the woodwork and declare “FAKE!”, let’s clarify one thing: these two photos (assembled into one image) are staged photographs from the Smithsonian Institute’s collection.

However, this did happen. Let me explain. Let’s take a fun, little detour from the typical historic articles.

New Bedford’s Mail Carriers in the 19th century. (Spinner Publications)

While the photographs were staged, they serve as hyperbolic images of actual historic events. The United States Postal Service’s precursor was called the United States Post Office, which was started in 1775 before the nation had official status. Its first Postmaster General was a fellow you may have heard of: Benjamin Franklin.

Before the “First American” headed the Post Office, there were a few attempts to get some sort of service running in the 1630s for a route from Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony to England. As colonies began to spring up throughout the 17th century, it was an organic part of the process to have routes connecting them.

In 1792, the United States Post Office was renamed to the United States Postal Service and the nation now officially had a legitimate delivery system in place that was government structured and run. In 1847, the postage was developed as a way to generate revenue for expansion and the increasing number of employees on the payroll. It cost .05 cents to send a letter up to 300 miles, .10 cents for anything over 300 miles. In the 1860s, massive growth in the rail industry led to expanded routes for the USPS and the rates reached a relative high of .06 cents in 1863.

However, by 1883 – two decades later – the rates would drop to .02 cents. While the USPS did have a Parcel Post system in place, it was only overseas to Europe. In 1913, Postmaster General Hitchcock aggressively sought to generate additional revenue for the department and felt that adding a domestic parcel post would do just that. He extended the service to domestic locations for the inexpensive rate of .02 cents plus an additional .02 cents per ounce over the first.

What many Post Offices looked like at the turn of the 19th centure; Mattapoisett Post Office (Spinner Publications)

This service and rate meant that people now had access to goods that they couldn’t find in their locale. Local and national economies benefited greatly from the service and it actually stimulated that national economy. This rate was so affordable that there are anecdotes of university students mailing their dirty laundry, since it was cheaper to mail than actually launder. In fact, people sent all sorts of things through the post – butter, eggs, groceries and even day old chicks and chickens!

Sending poultry and the publishing of an article in the New York Times that Hitchcock was entertaining the idea of delivering children as parcel post, gave a number of people a bright idea: since it was more expensive to travel by rail or coach, why not mail them?! Since the Post Office hadn’t yet had precedence for sending humans through the post, they charged the going rate for mailing chickens: .53 cents.

Within weeks mail parents Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Beagle of Glen Este, Ohio got the bright idea to send their baby – who was just under the 11lb limit – to his grandmother, a Mrs. Louis Beagle a mile down the road. Carrier Vernon O. Lytle gladly obliged and delivered (pardon the pun) the baby safe and sound. Since it was only a mile down the road, the Beagles got the discounted rate of .15 cents…with insurance of course.

Later, in a similar story, a grandmother in Stratford, Oklahoma, sent a two-year old child to his aunt in Wellington, Kansas. As the New York Times reports: “The boy wore a tag about his neck showing it had cost 18 cents to send him through the mails. He was transported 25 miles by rural route before reaching the railroad. He rode with the mail clerks, shared his lunch with them and arrived here in good condition.”

The third officially reported incident (there were plenty of others) is when parents of Charlotte May Pierstorff sent their daughter from Grangeville, Idaho to her grandparents in another part of the state. There is also mention of a 9-year-old girl, who entered the main Washington City Post Office and asked that she be sent to Kentucky, however she was denied.

The New Bedford Post Office on William Street near the Customs House. (Spinner Publications)

The mailing of Charlotte May Pierstorff was the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back. Postmaster General Hitchcock added regulations prohibiting the “mailing” of any human through the post.

On a rather large discussion thread on Facebook about this image, a number of people have made jokes about how they would have mailed their pesky sibling to North Korea or the Antarctica. It was advised that one remember to put the wrong return address lest the “package” be refused!

In essence, the mailing of children was never an official policy of the USPS. It was a sign of the times that people even considered the notion and it was really more of asking the postal worker for a favor because “he was going that way anyhow.” It wasn’t that there weren’t perverts or horrible things happening to children back then, but that people were more trusting, and perhaps a bit naive. Certainly people felt that one could trust a federal employee, anyhow.

On the aforementioned thread, a number of people shared stories of when they were children in the 1910s and 1920s. Here are two that stood out.


“I am 81 and me and my cousin were sent to Gramma by the milk train. We shared our lunch with the guys in the caboose and we had a great time. We were told they would look out for us and they did. It was a great adventure for this farm girl. Grampa worked for the railroad when he was a young man. We also rode the train when we were teenangers and went to Detroit from Nebraska to be in our cousin’s wedding. You couldn’t do that now. I remember the scene we did at Lincoln. We played the movie scene, kissing the boys goodbye, waving from the train as the boys ran throwing us kisses.B y the way these boys we knew and went along with the gag.”


“My father’s cousin was mailed by her father in Montana to his parents in western Indiana after the death of her mother from the 1918 flu epidemic, which also killed her aunt and baby cousin in Indiana. My Dad said she arrived safely, albeit dirty from coal dust from the train, and in possession of substantial funds much given her by other passengers. This was approximately 1920.

Her father was a mine worker in Butte and couldn’t take care of her. Children fly between parents today with airline staff as escorts I think. When children were mailed, they were looked after by the person responsible for the rest of the mail. They had money given by the sender and ate in the dining car or had food packed with them.

Kidnappers and other predators were not as prevalent then, and people in general looked out for each other. The young girl was 5 at the time, raised by her grandparents who also raised my Dad and his brother after the death of their mother. She grew up to become a wife, mother of four, and grandmother. She passed away 10 years ago. This has always been an interesting part of my family history. AND may you all escape this year’s flu safely!”





New Bedford Salchicharia; Portuguese delicacies to make you happy!

You want this in your life. Trust me.

New Bedford Salchicharia is a city icon. An institution. Like Giammalvo’s, Lydia’s, or Antonio’s. Synonymous with Linguica, cacoila and “Epa!”

Over three decades – at two great locations – of the finest quality ingredients and service have cemented them as the upper crust. Cream of the crop. So it’s a given that we have to share the Umbelina and Brazida families’ businesses with those who haven’t heard of, or been to one of the city’s finest – if not the finest – Salchicharia in the south coast.

How can that be you say? You’ve never heard of it? And what the heck is a Salchicharia anyway? While it’s hard to imagine someone who lives in New Bedford who isn’t of Portuguese descent, they DO exist. So there’s no fault there. There are even some of Portuguese descent a generation or two deep who have lost touch. No fault there either.


Shrimp Mozambique: one of many “Hot” dishes!

If you are of Portuguese descent, you know about the Umbelina ad Brazida family’s business. If you aren’t of Portuguese descent, you should know about the Umbelina and Brazida family’s business! With that in mind, I sat down for a few hours with the owners and we discussed the two businesses.

Don’t be intimidated by the hard to pronounce word. Think deli, market, or grocery store…but Portuguese style. Have you ever wanted to enjoy some of the dishes and delicacies that you find at the many area’s fine Portuguese restaurants? Perhaps, give your favorite dish a go? Not only will you find many of those ingredients available at New Bedford Salchicharia, but they will even do most of the work for you by preparing custom made platters to save you time for that birthday, anniversary, cookout or special occasion. They will marinate, dress, or butcher fresh meat – which is sourced locally. Pick it up, throw it on the grill and devour.

New Bedford Salchicharia also carries all the things you would get at a local chain convenience store – but cheaper. Canned goods, soft drinks, pastas, olive oil, local harvested vegetables, cookies, and more. If you could imagine a smaller Portuguese version of Shaw’s, you’ll get it.

New Bedford Salchicharia has been supplying New Bedford and beyond with staples like favas, homemade chourico, roasted potatoes & chicken, shrimp Mozambique, and shredded cacoila made daily. They also have non-Portuguese, American favorites like chicken wings, baked beans, roast beef, BBQ ribs, and Fish & Chips. For those of you with a deep memory of local history, you may recall that some 35 years ago they opened the first New Bedford Salchicharia on Cove Road. It was “connected” to the Pilot House and CJ’s Galley.

It’s difficult to get a business off the ground, let alone survive for 5 years or more. Novelty or fad can buy a business a few years.


One of two locations: N.B. Salchicharia is right off the “Ave” at 53 Belleville Road.

However, 10 years means you are doing something right and have developed a loyal customer base through hard work. Almost 4 decades? That’s something special.

What is that something special? The freshest, locally sourced produce and meats. That supports and bolsters the local economy. They are a family business handed from father to son that treats customers like family. You don’t take a number…you have a name. They “…appreciate every customer that walks through the door and respects every dollar that they spend.” You’ll never hear that from a chain!

They are genuinely grateful to be part of the community, not only through the service that they provide, but each year they join many local businesses in fundraising events to benefit St. Jude Children’s Hospital.

In previous articles, you may recall that I mention that I am a huge fan of old world traditions and customs, like the hand-shake, bonded word, and building a relationship, not “getting more customers.” Honest work for an honest buck. New Bedford Salchicharia can hold their head high with pride as a solid member in good standing within this small group.

So when you have a special occasion, game day is approaching, or you just want to relax and not have to prepare a huge meal – take a load off and consider heading to New Bedford Salchicharia. A true gem and one of my favorite spots to frequent. Perhaps we’ll bump into each other!


New Bedford Salchicharia

53 Belleville Road
New Bedford MA, 02745

6 Rockdale Avenue
New Bedford, MA 02744
Phone: (508) 997-0538

Monday: Closed
Tuesday-Friday: 7:00 am-6:00 pm
Saturday: 7:00 am-5:00 pm
Sunday: 7:00 am-12:00 noon

Facebook: facebook.com/newbedfordsal?rf=104315689633889


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New Bedford Streets; A Piece of Americana: Washburn Street

Northeast corner of Washburn Street & Acushnet Avenue in the 19th century. (Spinner Publications)

Welcome to next installment in the New Bedford Streets; A Piece of Americana series. Previously we covered William Street, Kempton Street, Middle Street, Centre Street, Ashley Boulevard, Elm Street, Coggeshall Street, Mechanics Lane and others. If you would like to read those or perhaps revisit them, they can be found by using the search bar to the right. You can also select the “Streets” category.

As usual, I’d like to re-iterate the importance of reader feedback, correction, and contributions. In the process of exploring these streets, I try to confirm or validate statements and dates by finding multiple sources. Unfortunately, if all those sources are making their statement based on an older, incorrect source, and there isn’t any dissenting information available, there’s no way to know otherwise. So by all means, please join in.

Washington and North First Street circa 1895. (Spinner Publications)

In addition, when trying to validate some statements, often there is very little to no information available. I haven’t decided which is worse – finding one source, or finding multiple sources, but not knowing if they were all founded on an inaccuracy. So help from local historians, those who remember, oral histories and anecdotes handed down through the generations, people with private collections, and even know-it-alls will help!

By all means, let us make this an open discussion to keep the “wiki” accurate.


How many times have you taken the Washburn Street exit? If you do any driving locally – that’s well, everyone – chances are you’ve taken the exit and driven on Washburn Street hundreds – nay, thousands – of times. This little strip of road spans the Acushnet River to Acushnet Avenue abutting Route 18. It’s a strip of road that folks rarely stop on and if it weren’t for Kyler’s Seafood, I wonder who would ever stop on it!

Frederic Augusts Washburn – was Washburn Street named in tribute to this prominent citizen?(Spinner Publications)

So how did this heavily trafficked thoroughfare earn its name? How did this street that many of us are on daily become Washburn Street? Let’s dig a little.

The Washburn name is a very old one that can be traced back to 13th century England, where it was Washborne or Washburne which is a fuller’s stream or stream where washing was done.

The family was a distinguished one whose vanguard was church warden John Washburn (1597-1669) who arrived in 1631 at Duxbury or Duxborrow as it was known then. After establishing himself as a town surveyor, grand juror and possibly as Secretary of Massachusetts Bay Colony, he returned to England to prepare his family’s passage to the New World. He returned in 1634, purchased a palisaded homestead called “The Eagles Nest” and his family, wife Margery (Moore), and sons John and Philip followed shortly thereafter aboard the historic Elizabeth and Anne in April of 1635.

John’s brother William started a line of Washburn’s in Long Island New York. All Washburns can be traced to these two forks. John and William were born of a rather well-to-do family. Their father John was a husbandman who had substantial land holdings. This status and the finances paved the way for John to serve his high social positions and to become one of 54 original proprietors of Bridgewater by purchasing land from the Massasoit Indians.

The prominence and privilege that the monies and position gave the Washburn family allowed them to have many children and spread over much of early New England, particularly Middleboro, Lakeville, Bridgewater, Providence, Connecticut and of course, eventually greater New Bedford. Future Washburns would serve in several Indian wars, the “French” war, the Revolutionary War, become generals, lawyers, Justice of the Courts, and Congressmen. There is historical mention of Bazeliel and Thomas Washburn who were on the payroll of the Company of His Majesty’s Service in the 1760s.

The first Washburn to come to New Bedford was Lieutenant Amos Washburn of Middleboro, now Lakeville. He served in that militia’s 7th Regiment, which came to Fairhaven and New Bedford to fend off the British when they landed here in 1778. A duty which earned him promotion to Captain. Amos was the great-great grandson of the original John Washburn from England. Historical records name five of his children, but it seems he had a few more. One of these children, James Washburn graduated from Harvard, class of ’89…1789 that is!

James went on to practice law in Middleboro, and was even appointed as postmaster by President John Quincy Adams in 1804. He was offered a Court Officer position in New Bedford, relocated here and thus starts the local Washburn legacy. In addition to his service as a Court Officer, James was part of a committee formed in 1814 to deal with the influx of privateers in New Bedford harbor that threatened the safety of the citizens. Alas, I couldn’t find much more in the historical record about James’ descendants.

Another descendant of the original John Washburn was Bridgewater’s Marsena Washburn who arrived in New Bedford in 1820. A housewright (and shop owner) and mechanic by trade, he married Lucy Gifford in 1823 and had five children. Their only son Frederic was a true “born and raised” New Bedford citizen. He started as a messenger for Merchant’s Bank on 50 North Water Street before rising in the ranks and becoming a cashier, then 2nd Clerk.

Washburn Hall at Tabor Academy in 1925 named in tribute to Frederic Washburn. (Spinner Publications)

After two decades of service there he became the assistant treasurer of the New Bedford Institution for Savings, which capacity he served in for 37 years. Frederic was very community and social minded and was quite busy in local endeavors. He was a member of the board of trustees for the Fourth Street Episcopal and Trinitarian churches, served as deacon and senior deacon, and was a superintendent of their bible schools. He also helped get the YMCA off the ground as its treasurer and president. Frederic also served as treasurer at Tabor Academy and the Washburn Hall or Dormitory built in 1905 was dedicated in his honor.

Based on his social status, community service, membership in various churches and lodges, and association with the YMCA and Tabor Academy it is my opinion that Washburn street was named after Frederic Washburn. Which Washburn do you think it was named after?

Other notable Washburns in New Bedford include:

  • Charles Washburn – Shipwright; carpenter that specialized in the construction of ships.
  • Leander Washburn – Block Maker; person who creates blocks for printing presses.
  • Lettice R. Washburn – Water Department Board 1914.Reuben Washburn, paper maker, soap maker, Pound Keeper for the Police Department and Hoseman for Acushnet Village’s Engine No. 21852.
  • William Washburn – Sailmaker
  • William H. Washburn – Director of King Manufacturing Company, office at 147 North Water Street and two story factory at 213, 215, 218. Window and door frames, artistic novelties rakes, mouldings, shutters, etc. Established in 1875 by Perry and Washburn. Employed 21 men.




20 Things To Do This Weekend (June 13-June 15)

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Grrrrr. Looks like more rain. The good news is it’s just for Friday and a quick morning shower on Saturday. Don’t get us wrong – rain is good. It’s not a bad thing. If it could just rain up to the minute and event starts and then continue when it’s over then all would be well. It’s a real bummer when weeks or even months out, you plan and prepare for an event only to have it cancelled. Nevertheless, temperatures will be dandy and conducive to participating in the many goings-on in the South Coast and beyond. So let’s get out there and enjoy!

As always, click on the title for more or detailed information on the event. Most of the events were pulled from our event calendar where you can find hundreds of local area events each month. The event calendar is FREE, so if you are a local business, and not taking advantage of FREE publicity, shame on you! Are you a local business and want to sponsor this high traffic, weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details. Have an event to add? Check out our tutorial. For more info, you can click on each title. Know of another event this weekend? Post a reply!


Friday, June 13th

20th Annual Clambake with Lobster (5:00-11:00pm)
To benefit the United Way of Greater New Bedford. Event catered by Foster’s Downeast Clambake of Maine, music by WIRED, professional photo booth, full cash bar, silent auction and more. Tickets $80 per person or $750 for ten pack. Purchase tickets at www.unitedwayofgnb.org or call (508) 994-9625 ext. 15. Pier 3.

Bring out your inner artist in a fun environment! Painting With A Splash!

Tri-Town Relay For Life (Mattapoisett) (6:00pm)
Each year, more than 4 million people in over 20 countries raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer through the Relay For Life movement.

Painting with a Splash: Sailboat & Starry Night (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.

FREE Lecture: “The Civil Rights Act–Fifty Years Late” (Marion) (7:00pm)
Sippican Historical Society: With the Elizabeth Taber Library presents a special lecture presentation with Gary Sousa. Sousa will present “The Civil Rights Act–Fifty Years Later.” Free. Marion Music Hall, 164 Front St. Phone: (508) 748-1116.


Saturday, June 14th

Antiques Appraisal Day (9:00am-4:00pm)
Part adventure, part history lesson, and part treasure hunt, Skinner Antiques of Boston will present an Antiques Appraisal Day on Saturday, June 14th, 9 am – 4 pm, at the Hawthorne Country Club in Dartmouth, MA. If you have a “special” something: an heirloom handed down as part of your family legacy or a collectible and you’ve always wondered about its value, you now have an opportunity to find out what it’s really worth. The event is presented by the New Bedford Education Foundation (NBEF) as a fundraiser for its ongoing support of programs in the New Bedford Public Schools.

Day Out with Thomas the Tank Engine (Carver) (9:00am-5:00pm)
Edaville USA: Kicking off the 2014 season with annual Day Out with Thomas the Tank Engine. Spend the day immersed in the storybook world of Thomas. Take a magical 20-minute ride on a 15-ton replica of Thomas and meet his kindly but stern boss Sir Topham Hat. Enjoy unlimited use of all our amusement rides and indoor and outdoor play spaces. $20. For information visit www.edaville.com. 5 Pine St.

It’s All About the Animals Annual Yard Sale (Rochester) (10:00am-2:00pm)
Help out animals by stopping in at the “It’s All About the Animals” Annual Yard Sale. All proceeds to benefit the shelter.

Get your metal (and a Diablo) on at No Problemo!

Polish Fest (11:00am)
Polka bands, famous polish kitchen, American food, Polka mass and various booths. To be held at the Our Lady of Perpetual Help church. 235 North Front St.

“Ride To Remember” Derek Vassal Motorcycle Run (12:00pm-4:00pm)
The Bonafide Saints is a non-profit 501(c)7 Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club and will be hosting the 1st Annual “Ride to Remember” Derek Vassal Motorcycle Run. Derek Vassal was a Correctional Officer who lost his life in a fatal car accident, leaving behind a beautiful young daughter yet to be born at the time of his passing.

The run is established by the Family of Derek, raising proceeds to award students of Dartmouth High School with a scholarship to college. Derek was known to be funny, caring and the life of the party! Derek would want nothing more than to have this run be a success and help students pay their way through college. To benefit students of Dartmouth High School. Run is rain or shine starting at noon at Stackhouse Fairgrounds and food and music from AC/DC tribute band Dirty Deeds follows run. ALL ARE WELCOME!

Redcoats & Residents (Wareham) (12:00pm)
Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the attack by the British warship HMS Nimrod. The weekend will consist of a militia encampment, contra dance, church service, War of 1812 Attack on wareham Re-enactment and more.

3rd Annual New Bedford JazzFest (2:00-7:00pm)
Famous jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis best described the importance of jazz; “Jazz music is America’s past and its potential, summed up and sanctified and accessible to anybody who learns to listen to, feel, and understand it.” I have always liked this quote…read more…

Waterfire Providence (7:00pm)
Full lighting to open the season. Lighting will commemorate The Gaspee Incident and the Birth of America. For information visit www.waterfire.org or call (401) 273-1155. Downtown Providence.

Painting with a Splash: Sunset Beach & Beach (7:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.

Pilgrim – Age of Taurus Metal Show at No Problemo (10:00pm)
One of the best eateries in the greater New Bedford area – OK, on planet earth – is always hosting great musical acts. There is a plan to bring more metal shows to the venue this summer and this is the show to kick it all off. If you love metal, great atmosphere, mouth watering food and the best Sangria around then head to No Problemo on Saturday!


Sunday, June 15th

Cornell Farm Bird Walk (7:00-9:00am)
Explore the fields, salt marsh, and newly completed boardwalk along the Little River in search of songbirds, waterfowl, and osprey with Bill Gil of the Paskamansett Bird Club.

Two days to find some treasures and help out a great cause!

It’s All About the Animals Annual Yard Sale (Rochester) (10:00am-2:00pm)
Help out animals by stopping in at the “It’s All About the Animals” Annual Yard Sale. All proceeds to benefit the shelter.

27th Annual Strawberry Festival (Assonet) (11:00am-4:00pm)
The Strawberry Festival, held every Father’s Day, features Homemade Strawberry Shortcake with whipped cream, hot dogs, lemonade,
Arts & Crafts for all ages. Entertainment will be provided by Berkley’s own Midnight Sun.

Father’s Day Bike Ride (Westport) (12:00pm)
Westport Rivers Watershed. Ride is a fundraiser for the Westport Watershed Alliance. Rides of 8.6 miles, 21 miles and 50 miles available. $50 for members, $60 for non-members, children under 16 ride for free. Ride begins and ends at Buzzards Bay Brewing. 98 Horseneck Road.

Polish Fest (12:00pm)
Polka bands, famous polish kitchen, American food, Polka mass and various booths. To be held at the Our Lady of Perpetual Help church. 235 North Front St.

Painting with a Splash: Van Gogh Yellow Flowers (2:00pm)
Welcome to Painting with a Splash Where you are the artist! Painting with a Splash is the newest addition to Historic Whaling City Downtown New Bedford. Bringing you an experience of art as entertainment. Add a little wine (BYOB) that will surely tap into your creative side. With step by step instruction and a little music, you and your friends will create the evenings featured painting with a splash of your own uniqueness. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Just a desire to have fun.

Want to sponsor this weekend guide? Contact info@newbedfordguide.com for more details.





YWCA Offers One-of-a-Kind Program for Those Who Lose a Spouse

The Widowed Persons Program of the YWCA has been fulfilling the diverse needs of widowed persons for the past 22 years

Losing a loved one is one of the most profound emotional traumas one can experience. As an adult, the death of a spouse is particularly life-altering. While there a need for immediate grief support, challenges often exist long after loss.

The Widowed Persons Program of the YWCA has been fulfilling the diverse needs of widowed persons for the past 22 years. It serves to address the many issues persons may face, providing immediate grief support as well as companionship for those who are widowed.

Linda Rose, Program Director for the Widowed Persons Program explains, “The program serves newly widowed men and women who are going through the grieving process. It provides mixed group support and one-on-one emotional support, plus resources and referral information.” The program is also modeled on providing “mutual self-help” as participants find that talking with others in the same situation provides the greatest source of support.

Skinner Appraisers to bring Antiques Event to New Bedford

Providing social support is what Rose sees as particularly valuable. “Many program participants feel isolated and alone before coming to WPP. Many were caregivers for years and have lost contact with the outside world,” she says. “WPP provides a place for them to go and discuss their needs, make new friends, and discuss their problems with other people who care, listen, and understand.”

In addition, the program facilitates various trainings and presentations throughout the year. For many who are widowed, there may exist a sudden inability to complete certain daily tasks. For some, a deceased spouse may have handled all of the household’s financial matters. For others, the surviving spouse may not or may never have driven a car. Guest educators and presenters help teach new skills (e.g. using technology, paying bills, cooking, understanding finances, etc.).

Even beyond the grieving process, those who attend the Widowed Persons Program remain involved long after the initial stages of loss. Many later serve as outreach volunteers to help the newly widowed regain their sense of well-being. In addition, participants form lasting friendships and participate in various activities together throughout the year.

“Twice a year, some of the widowed take a bus trip to Indian Head Resort in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Once a year they go to the Newport Play House. We have a non-denominational Memorial Service in August, a Social from April to October with music and a catered meal, and six support groups (via the Dartmouth and New Bedford Councils on Aging) after which some of the widowed go for either coffee or out to lunch,” Rose says. “And sometimes if one person hears of something going on in the community, they let the other know and a group will get together and attend the function.”

The special programs helps the newly widowed regain their sense of well-being.

When asked what she thinks makes the program particularly unique, Rose said, “WPP is the only program of its kind in this area. All other support groups in this area are for anyone grieving a loss of any kind.” The toll of losing one’s spouse often carries an additional burden and as a result, the program provides more than just a ‘support group’ setting. It offers trainings, outings to bond and form friendships, and creates a lasting foundation for companionship and support.

The Widowed Persons Program is just one of many community-based services offered by the YWCA of Southeastern Massachusetts. The program is open to widowed persons of all ages who are going through the grieving process. There is no fee for any service; however, voluntary donations are gratefully accepted.

Note from the Executive Director, Gail Fortes: The YWCA of Southeastern Massachusetts is concluding a $5.6 million Under One Roof capital campaign to fund the construction of a new 17,000 square foot LEED-certified building addition onto the historic Levi Standish House in New Bedford. Transporting the YWCA’s programs to a new, specifically-designed building will have a significantly positive impact on the disadvantaged children enrolled in our childcare program, the at-risk women in our residential program, and every YWCA constituent. The new building will not only be central, providing services Under One Roof, but will offer appropriately-designed spaces, controlled and nurturing settings, and a handicap accessible center-city campus. As a result, the YWCA will better serve over 4,000 women and children annually within its expanded Levi Standish House in a more cost-effective manner.





Trader Jan’s Archery Pro-Shop: Shoots a bullseye with local archery enthusiasts

Everything archery related under the sun…and under Trader Jan’s roof!

Are you an archery enthusiast? Hunter? Hobbyist? If you’ve had anything to do with archery in the past two decades you know all about Trader Jan’s Archery Pro Shop. If you are thinking about getting into archery for whatever reason, you will soon know about them!

Since 1991 Trader Jan’s has been serving the archery community in the south coast Masschusetts area. Trader Jan’s is the longest running family owned and operated Archery Pro Shop in Southeastern Massachusetts and for darn good reasons: anything and everything archery related is found under one roof, serviced by a family with decades of experience done in a very friendly way. This is a place where everyone knows your name – as was evident during my entire visit. Current owner and Dartmouth native Jill Oliveira and the frequent customers that came and went, exchanged friendly banter and addressed each other by first name.

The pro-shop is in an unassuming mill building tucked away on the 2nd floor. Don’t be fooled however. You will be shocked when you walk through the mill and open the door to Trader Jan’s.

Archery is a rewarding experience for all age groups!

It’s like a mom & pop version of Dick’s Sporting Goods or a Bass Pro Shop. It’s a rather large spot and to be honest, I had no idea that there was this much to archery. The last time I shot an arrow was when I was a teenager, some time in the Pleistocene. Back then one shot at trees, a coffee can or Wooly Mammoth.

I was curious what had happened in the interim and Jill had explained that one wasn’t restricted to hunting or shooting around in your backyard. There were archery clubs, indoor shooting ranges, and even a 3D video range! Archery had come a long way since I was shooting at cans in the 80s – or since the bow was first invented 15,000 years ago for that matter. While archery was used for military and survival purposes for thousands of years, when firearms came into use, archery went into a steep decline.

It wouldn’t be until the 18th century that archery would undergo a revival through recreational activities. In the 19th century it became a legitimate sport and with the advent of the 20th century and the opening of Asia, the world had learned that it could also be an art form, as Japan practices with Kyūjutsu.

To this long list of archery activities, Jill mentioned that there are a fair amount of couples who go on dates to Trader Jan’s. Popcorn and a movie is way overrated!

Traditional, compound, recurve bows and even crossbows!

Regardless of the reason one takes up the bow and arrow, there are a number of benefits. One of the obvious reasons attached to hunting is that it equals food for the family and perhaps a trophy. Recreationally speaking, whether indoor or outdoors, there is a fair amount of walking. Even in an indoor gallery one has to go back and forth to retrieve arrows to shoot them again. It’s not all “legs” though as there is some upper body strength that is developed from drawing the bow repeatedly.

There is a social aspect when accompanied by friends or family and mentally focus and attention are developed. All the while you learn a new skill. In a way, it is a martial art with all the discipline that comes with it.

In terms of archery gear, there are compound bows for youth and adults, longbows, recurve bows, a variety of sights and targets, arrow rests, bow cases, stabilizers, quivers, crossbows, and hundreds of other accessories. All these can be purchased in person at the shop, or through the online store.

In addition, Trader Jan’s offers a number of services. Want to customize your arrows or bow? Want to repair or refletch your arrows? Bow giving you issues? Want custom strings? No problem. Trader Jan’s has a full service bow repair shop, you bring it in and if it can be repaired Trader Jan’s Archery Pro-Shop Bow repair specialist can fix it.

New to it all? Need some help? Trader Jan’s offers lessons. Have some questions? Check out the FAQ or better yet stop in. Want to get involved in the many events or youth/adult leagues? Check out their dedicated page.

If you aren’t the outdoors type, you can use the indoor ranges. There are 10, 20 and a 40 yard range which is marked from 5 yards to 40 yards. Trader Jan’s offers range rates are $10.00 an hour and $5.00 a half hour with your own gear, per person. $20.00 an hour and $13.00 per half hour with our rental gear, per person. Tuesday’s is their half price shooting day. The rates are $5.00 and hour and $3.00 a half hour with your own gear, per person and $10.00 an hour and $7.00 a half hour with their rental gear, per person.

Off-season hours (from January to August) are Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 4:30 PM to 8 PM and Saturday 11 AM to 5 PM. They are closed Sunday, Monday, and Thursday. Busy season hours (August to end of December ) they are open Tuesday through Friday from 4:30 PM to 9 PM and Saturday 11 AM to 5 PM. Closed Sunday & Monday.

The coolest thing I saw while I was there was the area’s only 3D video range. This range has 500 different screens and scenarios. An animal is walking or running through the wild and you shoot specially tipped arrows at a Kevlar screen. Wherever your arrow strikes is lit with a color and recorded. A demo can be seen here. As of the date of this article, rates are $5 for half an hour or $8 an hour. Call ahead to be sure.

So whether you are already an archer or considering taking up a new hobby, you’ll find in Trader Jan’s a world class facility with everything you could possibly need under one roof. All serviced by a friendly, knowledgeable, experienced staff: Jill!

Trader Jan’s Archery Pro-Shop

Jill Oliveira
288 Plymouth Ave
Fall River, Massachusetts 02721
Tues, Wed, Fri: 4:30pm-8:00pm
Saturday: 11:00am-5:00pm

Phone: (774) 627-7743
Email: traderjans@aol.com
Website: www.traderjans.com/
Facebook: facebook.com/pages/Trader-Jans-Archery-Pro-Shop/197241740347687


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