New Bedford’s Portuguese Feast still on schedule for this summer

While New Bedford’s Cape Verdean Recognition Parade and Memorial Day parade have been canceled, and Fall River’s Day of Portugal has been postponed, the 2020 Feast of the Blessed Sacrament in New Bedford is still moving forward as planned. This year’s festival is scheduled for July 30-31 and August 1-2.

The following was sent out last week by Club Madeirense S. S. Sacramento Inc President Michael Canasta:

“Good afternoon Fellow members of Club Madeirense S. S. Sacramento Inc., family and friends, residents of our great City of New Bedford and Feast patrons from close and afar,
 
I hope that at the time this message gets out to you, that you and your families are all healthy and safe knowing what our city, state and country are going through dealing with this life threatening COVID-19 virus. At this point and time our Club and grounds have been temporarily closed, resulting

In the cancellation and postponement of all events scheduled at Madeira Field, presently up to the end of May. However, this was done for the safety of our members and their families, organizations renting our grounds and the public. Just a reminder that our organization has extended the deadline for applications to both the academic scholarships and the vocational awards to June 1st, 2020.
   
I hope I put you at ease knowing that I am in constant touch with our Club’s Executive Officers as well as our Club’s Board of Directors, meeting as often as needed each month, as we all strive to get through this period of time of home confinement to beat the COVID-19 virus.
    
In my opinion, our Club is the best at what we do, with each year learning and growing to give you all the best and safest Feast possible as we enter our 106th year. Feast President Richard Fernandes and the 2020 Feast Committee are presently moving forward with their plans for the 2020 Feast of the Blessed Sacrament. As always and even more so now with what our society is dealing with, the safety and well-being of everyone is our primary concern, not just for our members and their families, but for all our volunteers and all you people that support our organization and the Feast, year after year, during our pride filled celebration of the Feast of the Blessed Sacrament.
    
Now that we have recently opened the door to spring, I know that there are many of you that are getting fidgety with cabin fever, especially since we have been asked to implement home confinement and social distancing. As the President and leader of our amazing organization, I can only ask that we all remain positive and to please listen and adhere to what our government officials are asking of us. The goal of Club Madeirense S. S. Sacramento Inc. is to bring all our Feast families back to Madeira Field as soon as it is safe and as soon as we can. Remember, www.feastoftheblessedsacrament.com

We will get through this together.
Be safe and God’s Blessings to You All.”

Do meu coração para o teu,
Have a Blessed Easter!

Michael R. Canasta, President
Club Madeirense S. S. Sacramento Inc.




Massachusetts COVID-19 related cases top 41,000, state approaches 2,000 deaths

Massachusetts Coronavirus Update

On April 21, the Massachusetts Public Health Department reported that the state added 1,556 more positive cases of COVID-19 bringing to total to 41,199. This is a slight decrease from Monday’s 1,566 reported cases. 152 new COVID-19 related deaths were reported since yesterday, up from 103, bringing the total deaths in Massachusetts to 1,961. As of 4 pm today, 175,372 people in Massachusetts have been tested for COVID-19.

The Baker-Polito Administration today announced new actions to support the ongoing COVID-19 response, including extending the closure of all public and private schools through the end of the school year, and the closure of all non-emergency child care programs until June 29, 2020. The Administration also announced further support for students and families impacted by COVID-19. Full details here.

A fifth Bristol County staff member to test positive for COVID-19. Full details here.

Massachusetts workers would receive 80 extra hours, or 10 days, of job-protected paid sick time to use during the COVID-19 crisis, under a bill recently filed by Rep. Paul Donato and Sen. Jason Lewis. Full details here.

New Bedford Coronavirus Update

Mayor Jon Mitchell’s office reported 90 additional confirmed COVID-19 cases in New Bedford Tuesday morning, bringing the total positive cases in the city to 278, up from 188 on Monday. Yesterday, Mayor Mitchell reported that the City of New Bedford’s COVID-19 count was more than 33% higher than the Massachusetts Department of Health count for New Bedford. Full statement here.

New Bedford added one more COVID-19 related death since Monday bringing the total to 10. No specific details (age, sex of the patient, etc) is available.

New Bedford’s 2020 Memorial Day parade, scheduled for Monday, May 25, has been canceled due to social distancing measures in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Full details here.

New Bedford’s Annual Cape Verdean Recognition Parade has been canceled. This year’s parade would have been the 48th year. Full details here.

Fall River Coronavirus Update

Fall River today reported 5 more confirmed positive cases of COVID-19. According to Mayor Coogan, the Fall River has seen 189 total positive cases. Full details here.




Fifth Bristol County Sheriff’s staff member tests positive for COVID-19

“He’s feeling fine,” Bristol County Sheriff Thomas M. Hodgson said Tuesday. “It’s encouraging he’s feeling well and we hope he makes a full, quick recovery.”

The corrections officer works third shift at the House of Corrections on the Dartmouth complex. He was last at the facility on Monday night, April 13, when he worked alone in a control room. He was off Tuesday and Wednesday, April 14 and 15. He didn’t feel well on Wednesday, reported to a COVID-19 testing site on Thursday, April 16, and received a positive test result on Friday, April 17.

He is the fifth Bristol County staff member to test positive for COVID-19. A nurse who tested positive last month has recovered and returned to duty, as has a K9 Officer who tested positive a few weeks ago. A corrections officer who tested positive earlier this month is returning to duty today, and a mental health professional that also tested positive is feeling well and expected to return soon. No one incarcerated in a Bristol County corrections facility has tested positive for the virus as seven symptomatic individuals have all tested negative.

Over the past month, the Bristol County Sheriff’s Office has instituted many protocols to protect inmates, detainees and staff from the Coronavirus outbreak. Some of those measures include:

• All employees were given masks that must be worn inside the secure perimeter of our facilities. All inmates and detainees have also been given masks to wear for protection.
• All areas of the facility are being cleaned\disinfected every day on every shift.
• All staff members are being screened before entering the buildings; new arriving inmates are being screened before being accepted into custody.
• In-person visitation has been suspended to limit the number of people coming in and out.

“The precautions we’ve taken are working, and the staff has been amazing,” Sheriff Hodgson said. “Our essential workers leave their families every day and come to work. From the security staff to food services, health care, maintenance … everyone has been amazing during these extremely challenging times. Massachusetts has been hit very hard by the Coronavirus and the next few weeks are expected to be pretty rough, so I hope everyone stays safe, practices social distancing, and follows strict sanitation recommendations.”




Baker announces extension of school and non-emergency child care program closure

The Baker-Polito Administration today announced new actions to support the ongoing COVID-19 response, including extending the closure of all public and private schools through the end of the school year, and the closure of all non-emergency child care programs until June 29, 2020. The Administration also announced further support for students and families impacted by COVID-19.

Schools and Non-Emergency Child Care Programs: Governor Charlie Baker issued an emergency order extending the closure of all public and private schools through the end of the school year, and the closure of all non-emergency child care programs until June 29, 2020 in an effort to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in the Commonwealth.

· This order expands the March 25 order suspending normal educational operations at schools and non-emergency child care programs. The Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) established a process to approve Exempt Emergency Child Care Programs to serve families of first responders, medical personnel and essential workers.

· Emergency Child Care programs approved by EEC will continue operating. Currently there are 523 emergency child care programs statewide serving families of essential workers. Weekly attendance averages about 2,500 children in these programs across the Commonwealth.

· EEC will continue to pay subsidies to child care providers based on their pre-COVID-19 enrollment, in order to support the workforce.

· The order does not apply to residential special education schools.

Read the Orders here: K-12 School Order Link | Child Care Program Link

Child Care Program Resources: The Department of Early Education and Care is reviewing its regulations and funding programs to develop new approaches to incrementally restore child care capacity for family child care and center-based programs in the coming months.

To support families of essential workers and families with children who have special needs, EEC and Care.com have partnered to assist currently unemployed child care workers and provide skilled in-home care. Care.com is offering both eligible families and child care workers free 90-day premium memberships, accessible here.

Complementing the existing partnership between WGBH and DESE, EEC is launching further collaboration with WGBH to provide resources and activities for parents with young children.

Remote Learning Resources: The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) will issue updated guidelines for schools to support remote learning efforts through the duration of the school year, including expanded STEM learning, and will prepare recommendations to strengthen summer learning opportunities for students.

DESE has launched a Remote Learning Essentials initiative, focused on addressing access to tools, Internet connectivity, and educator training necessary to enhance remote learning during school closures.

The department is conducting a survey of school districts to identify barriers that inhibit effective remote learning, including challenges around inequitable access to technology.

An advisory group of administrators, educators, parents, students and business leaders will engage external partners to mobilize resources for schools, including philanthropic gifts and in-kind contributions.

DESE will also solicit input from national and local education vendors regarding the potential to create a statewide online education platform for districts to opt into and customize.

STEM Learning: In partnership with EEC, DHE, the STEM Advisory Council and Regional STEM Networks, DESE has established online STEM education resources to provide continued support for remote learning opportunities. This includes virtual STEM learning opportunities for both students and teachers, and is accessible here.

No-Interest Student Loan Program: The Massachusetts Department of Higher Education (DHE) is deferring scheduled repayments for its No-Interest Loan Program for a duration of four months to support relief efforts during the COVID-19 public health emergency. These deferments will help approximately 12,000 students that participate in the $5 million program annually funded through the repayment of loans.

All no-interest loan accounts currently in repayment will automatically be placed in a deferment from April 2020 through July 2020. This deferment will not count toward the program’s permissible 36 months of available deferment.

If a payment has already been made for April, that payment will be applied to the outstanding balance and not refunded. While accounts are in deferment, borrowers who wish to continue monthly payments may do so, without incurring late fees until July 31, 2020.

Accounts currently 120 days past due will not be placed into collections until August 2020, and regular credit bureau reporting will resume at the end of August.

Eviction and Foreclosure Protections: Yesterday, Governor Baker signed legislation into law to protect homeowners and tenants from eviction and foreclosure. An Act providing for a moratorium on evictions and foreclosures during the COVID-19 emergency ensures housing stability for residents and families, and can be read in its entirety here.




Governor Baker: Massachusetts schools won’t reopen this academic year

Chris Lisinski
State House News Service

Massachusetts school buildings will remain closed to students for the rest of this school year, Gov. Charlie Baker announced Tuesday, a dramatic step aimed at preventing a rebound in COVID-19 transmission once the state emerges from the worst of the outbreak.

Baker also ordered non-emergency child care programs to remain closed until June 29. K-12 schools had been closed until May 4 under Baker’s most recent executive order, and Tuesday’s announcement extends the physical shutdown through the end of the academic year. Remote learning will continue this spring, he said. During a Tuesday press conference, Baker warned that COVID-19 is “an insidious and at times invisible virus.”

“It’s the right thing to do considering the facts on the ground associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. At this point in time, there is no authoritative guidance or advisory with respect to how to operate schools safely and how to get students to and from schools safely,” he said. “We believe students therefore cannot safely return to school and avoid the risk of transmitting the virus to others.”

The state is in the midst of the coronavirus surge, with confirmed cases likely to surpass 40,000 in the administration’s Tuesday afternoon daily updated. More than 1,800 residents have already died as a result of the highly infectious virus, which public health experts warn can be spread even by those who are showing no symptoms. On April 10, Baker signed a law allowing Education Commissioner Jeff Riley to vacate MCAS testing for the year and instructing the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to modify or waive graduation requirements. Several other governors have shuttered schools in their states into the summer, including New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu.




New Bedford COVID-19 cases corrected to 278 from 188, deaths now at 10

Mayor Jon Mitchell’s office reported 90 additional confirmed COVID-19 cases in New Bedford Tuesday morning, bringing the total positive cases in the city to 278, up from 188 on Monday. Yesterday, Mayor Mitchell reported that the City of New Bedford’s COVID-19 count was more than 33% higher than the Massachusetts Department of Health count for New Bedford. Full statement here.

New Bedford added one more COVID-19 related death since Monday bringing the total to 10. No specific details (age, sex of the patient, etc) is available.

New Bedford’s 2020 Memorial Day parade, scheduled for Monday, May 25, has been canceled due to social distancing measures in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Full details here.

Fall River added 5 more confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 on Monday. According to Mayor Coogan, the City of Fall River has seen 184 total positive cases. Full details here.

On April 20, the Massachusetts Public Health Department reported that the state added 1,566 more positive cases of COVID-19 bringing to total to 39,643. This is a decrease from Sunday’s 1,705 reported cases. 103 new COVID-19 related deaths were reported since yesterday, down from 146, bringing the total deaths in Massachusetts to 1,809. As of 4 pm today, 169,398 people in Massachusetts have been tested for COVID-19. Full details here.

Governor Charlie Baker signed a housing security bill on Monday to put a pause on evictions and foreclosures until after the coronavirus pandemic abates, finalizing an effort that took weeks for the Legislature to negotiate. Full details here.




OPINION: Based on the data, isn’t it time to start opening up Massachusetts again?

Yesterday, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health released its most detailed COVID-19 report yet. While it’s a lot of data to consume and analyze, it’s hard to argue that Massachusetts needs to continue to hibernate its population.

The first data that caught my attention is that the average age of confirmed COVID-19 deaths is 81 years old. Out of the 1,809 deaths attributed to COVID-19, 1,144 we people over 80 years old, or 63%. In fact, 95% of all deaths are people 60 and older. Only 21 people under the age of 50 have died, or 1.1% of the total deaths. This virus is killing the elderly and rarely people 50 and under.

Second, 97.5% of the people that died had underlying health issues.

This data reaffirms what I learned in March as Italy COVID-19 deaths were peaking and 99% of those dying had preexisting conditions and nearly 50% of those that died had three or more preexisting conditions. The average death was also in the 80s.

Finally, nearly a third of random participants in a Massachusetts study tested positive for antibodies linked with coronavirus, without even knowing they had COVID-19.

The Mass. General study took samples from 200 residents on the street in Chelsea, MA. Participants remained anonymous and provided a drop of blood to researchers, who were able to produce a result in ten minutes with a rapid test.

Sixty-four of the participants tested positive – a “sobering” result, according to Thomas Ambrosino, Chelsea’s city manager.

“We’ve long thought that the reported numbers are vastly under-counting what the actual infection is,” Ambrosino told the Boston Globe. “Those reported numbers are based on positive COVID-19 tests, and we’re all aware that a very, very small percentage of people in Chelsea and everywhere are getting COVID-19 tests.”

This means a very large percentage of the population has COVID-19 and doesn’t even know it because they don’t get sick or the symptoms are so mild they don’t notice it. Elderly are already dying in large numbers while we have our state locked down, suggesting that the problem is likely with the nursing homes and a lockdown isn’t going to

I’m not suggesting we open up Massachusetts like it was pre-coronavirus. What I’m saying is it’s time to let the least vulnerable population go back to work and perform everyday activities with new precautions in place (no concerts, major sports evets, etc.) while protecting the most vulnerable population. Continue to lock down the nursing homes, ramp up testing and of course the social distancing and washing hands that have been so impactful. The experts need to tell us the best way to open back up and I’m sure it will be a phased approach, but the conversation needs to start today and the actions need to come sooner than later or the economic damage could be devastating.

RI has a good plan to start reopening:




New bill would provide extra 10 days of sick leave in Massachusetts

Katie Lannan
State House News Service

Massachusetts workers would receive 80 extra hours, or 10 days, of job-protected paid sick time to use during the COVID-19 crisis, under a bill recently filed by Rep. Paul Donato and Sen. Jason Lewis.

According to the Raise Up Massachusetts coalition, the emergency paid sick time would be available to workers not covered under the sick time provisions of the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act — those working for a private employer with more than 500 employees, and those working at health care or residential facilities that have the option to exempt themselves from the federal law. The leave would be available for workers diagnosed with COVID-19, experiencing symptoms of the disease and awaiting a diagnosis, or those who are quarantined or reasonably believe their health is at risk, as well as to care for a family member or roommate with COVID-19.

“In hospitals, grocery stores, and nursing homes, essential workers are doing heroic work fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, but many of our essential workers lack the ability to stay home with pay if they are sick,” Donato said in a statement. “We need to do everything we can to protect Massachusetts workers on the front lines of the pandemic, including passing this legislation to fill in the gaps in the federal response. No worker should feel the need to come to work sick and risk infecting others.”

The bill (HD 5039) was filed on Friday in the House.




Massachusetts COVID-19 related deaths drop 29% from Sunday

Massachusetts Coronavirus Update

On April 20, the Massachusetts Public Health Department reported that the state added 1,566 more positive cases of COVID-19 bringing to total to 39,643. This is a decrease from Sunday’s 1,705 reported cases. 103 new COVID-19 related deaths were reported since yesterday, down from 146, bringing the total deaths in Massachusetts to 1,809. As of 4 pm today, 169,398 people in Massachusetts have been tested for COVID-19.

Governor Charlie Baker signed a housing security bill on Monday to put a pause on evictions and foreclosures until after the coronavirus pandemic abates, finalizing an effort that took weeks for the Legislature to negotiate. Full details here.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday that his state has already identified 400 ventilators that it could send to Massachusetts. Full details here.

New Bedford Coronavirus Update

Today, Mayor Jon Mitchell reported that the City of New Bedford’s COVID-19 count was more than 33% higher than the Massachusetts Department of Health count for New Bedford. As of today, the State reported 188 cases, but Mayor Mithcell reports the City’s Health Department counted “more than 250 cases.” Here’s Mayor Mitchell’s statement here.

New Bedford’s Annual Cape Verdean Recognition Parade has been canceled. This year’s parade would have been the 48th year. Full details here.

Fall River Coronavirus Update

Fall River has seen 5 more confirmed positive cases of COVID-19. According to Mayor Coogan, the city has seen 184 total positive cases. Full details here.




Warren calls for COVID-19 relief package to include undocumented immigrants

United States Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) today joined Senator Mazie K. Hirono (D-Hawai’i) and Representative Judy Chu (D-Calif.), along with 27 senators and 76 members of the House of Representatives, in writing to members of Congressional leadership to call for an inclusive coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) relief package that ensures that urgently-needed COVID-19 testing and medical care and relief benefits are accessible by all communities, regardless of limited English proficiency or immigration status. In their letter, the Members of Congress highlighted the immigrant workers who are on the front lines of the coronavirus response as health care workers, farmworkers, grocery store workers, and other essential service providers.

“As Congress responds to the critical needs of our country during the COVID-19 pandemic, we urge you to ensure that the vital protections and economic lifelines provided in coronavirus relief legislation are accessible to all communities, regardless of immigration status or limited English proficiency,” the Members of Congress wrote. “COVID-19 has caused one of the greatest public health and economic crises our Nation has ever faced, and it requires a whole-of-society approach. A response that leaves out immigrants-many of whom are on the front lines in our fight against COVID-19-will be ineffective and detrimental to our efforts to stop this pandemic.”

The Members of Congress continued: “We strongly urge you to build on the critical steps Congress has taken to protect families and workers in prior coronavirus relief packages by including the above-mentioned common sense measures in the upcoming relief legislation. We also ask that you provide robust funding for government agencies and community based-organizations to provide information about these coronavirus services in at least the languages described as most encountered in the 2016 FEMA Language Access Plan.”

Earlier this month, Senator Warren also joined Senator Hirono, Senator Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Representative Chu, Representative Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), and Representative Lou Correa (D-Calif.) to release the Coronavirus Immigrant Families Protection Act, legislation that would provide critical assistance to vulnerable communities impacted by COVID-19, regardless of immigration status or English language proficiency. The legislation is supported by more than 70 organizations, including labor unions, civil rights groups, and immigrant rights groups.

In addition to Senators Warren and Hirono and Representative Chu, the letter to House and Senate leadership was signed by Senators Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Bob Casey (D-Pa.), Jack Reed (D-R.I.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Michael Bennet (D-Colo.), Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawai’i), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Tom R. Carper (D-Del.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.), and Representatives Lou Correa (D-Calif.), Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), Jim McGovern (D-Mass.), Jesús “Chuy” García (D-Ill.), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Grace Napolitano (D-Calif.), Jimmy Panetta (D-Calif.), Yvette Clarke (D-N.Y.), Nydia Velázquez (D-N.Y.), Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), Jahana Hayes (D-Conn.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), Peter Welch (D-Vt.), Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), Alan Lowenthal (D- Calif.), Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.), Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.), Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-N.J.), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), Terri Sewell (D-Ala.), Ruben Gallego (D-Ariz.), Sylvia Garcia (D-Texas), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Ted Deutch (D-Fla.), Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), Bobby Rush (D-Ill.), Jason Crow (D-Colo.), Bill Foster (D-Ill.), John Larson (D-Conn.), Steven Horsford (D-Nev.), Hank Johnson (D-Ga.), Ed Perlmutter (D-Colo.), Dina Titus (D-Nev.), Darren Soto (D-Fla.), Mark Pocan (D-Wis.), Mark Takano (D-Calif.), Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan (D-CNMI), Adam Smith (D-Wash.), Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), Joaquin Castro (D-Texas), David Cicilline (D-R.I.), Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.), Adriano Espaillat (D-N.Y.), Danny Davis (D-Ill.), Kathy Castor (D-Fla.), Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.), Al Green (D-Texas), Suzanne Bonamici (D-Ore.), Thomas Suozzi (D-N.Y.), TJ Cox (D-Calif.), Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), Grace Meng (D-N.Y.), Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), Gil Cisneros (D-Calif.), Doris Matsui (D-Calif.), Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), Alma Adams (D-N.C.), Linda Sánchez (D-Calif.), Jerry McNerney (D-Calif.), Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), Jim Langevin (D-R.I.), Deb Haaland (D-N.M.), Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), José Serrano (D-N.Y.), Jared Huffman (D-Calif.), Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), Karen Bass (D-Calif.), Nanette Diaz Barragán (D-Calif.), Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.), Don Beyer (D-Va.), Juan Vargas (D-Calif.), and Albio Sires (D-N.J.).

Senator Warren has cosponsored the Federal Immigrant Release for Safety and Security Together (FIRST) Act, introduced by Senator Booker and Representative Jayapal, to move immigrants out of detention and halt immigration enforcement against individuals not deemed a significant public safety risk during the pandemic.

In early March, she led a letter urging the Trump Administration to suspend all immigration enforcement actions in and around hospitals and other medical facilities.

She recently joined her colleagues in a letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) pushing for the release of vulnerable and low-risk detained persons from DHS custody as the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise. She and her colleagues previously wrote to DHS, ICE, and CBP asking about their plans to prepare for the possible spread of COVID-19 within DHS facilities.

She joined Senator Durbin in urging President Trump to automatically extend work authorizations for recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Temporary Protected Status during the pandemic.

On March 11, she sent a letter with Senator Markey raising concerns about the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) handling of COVID-19 prevention efforts in the immigration courts. Senator Warren later urged DOJ to close all immigration courts to prevent the spread of the virus.

She has also introduced the Prioritizing Pandemic Prevention Act (S. 3510), legislation to defund the border wall and direct those funds to combating COVID-19.

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